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Employee Support | Homewood Health EAP EFAP Healthy Workplaces Blog

Return-to-work expectations are the greatest predictor of how long an employee will be off the job

Recent research from the Insti­tute for Work and Health rein­forces evi­dence that patients who are opti­mistic about recov­ery fol­low­ing an injury will actu­ally recover and return to work faster than patients who are less opti­mistic— a find­ing that should be rec­og­nized in case man­age­ment decisions.

As noted by the Insti­tute for Work and Health:

Dr. Jason Busse has recently com­pleted a study offer­ing their Somatic Pre-occupation and Cop­ing (SPOC) ques­tion­naire to patients with bro­ken shin bones (i.e. tib­ial shaft frac­tures) about their expe­ri­ences with symp­toms, cop­ing abil­i­ties and recov­ery beliefs. Tib­ial frac­tures were selected because they are the most com­mon type of long bone frac­ture and they tend to dis­pro­por­tion­ately affect young peo­ple in the workforce.

Six weeks after surgery, researchers admin­is­tered the 27-item SPOC ques­tion­naire to 359 patients and linked the ques­tion­naire scores to the patients’ outcomes.

The results? The six-week SPOC scores were a more pow­er­ful pre­dic­tor of recov­ery and return to work than age, gen­der, frac­ture type, smok­ing sta­tus or the pres­ence of mul­ti­ple injuries.

Accord­ing to Busse, two ques­tions are cen­tral: Can we mod­ify patients’ beliefs? And will such changes result in improved out­comes? “If we can do these two things, then we have some­thing very excit­ing,” he says. “This study pro­vides strong evi­dence that there’s more to people’s expe­ri­ence of recov­ery from injury than sim­ply tis­sue repair.”

Source: Insti­tute for Work and Health

This study rein­forces com­mon research find­ings, and employer expe­ri­ences, that employ­ees’ expec­ta­tions and fears about return­ing to work bet­ter pre­dict how long they’ll be out of work moreso than most (if not all) other fac­tors, includ­ing a clin­i­cal diagnosis.

What we are iden­ti­fy­ing is that a med­ical diag­no­sis does not tell you how long an employee will be off work. If it did, there would not be cases in which one employ­ees ask for accom­mo­da­tions to return to the job while a sec­ond, sim­i­larly injured employee, takes a dis­abil­ity absence leave. With diag­no­sis held con­stant, the only dif­fer­ence between the two employ­ees is motivation.

This behav­iour is com­pletely under­stand­able when you adopt the employee’s point of view. Any­time a per­son is fear­ful of some­thing, they will avoid it. If they are fear­ful of rein­jury, stigma, non-supportive super­vi­sors, or being unable to per­form their job duties in the future, they are going to delay their return until these con­cerns are addressed. And it is unlikely that they, them­selves, will take steps to address these concerns.

At the same time, some fac­tors are beyond the employee’s con­scious con­trol. For exam­ple, they may feel anx­i­ety and are con­cerned that they will fail, or guilt and the con­cern that they are impos­ing upon co-workers.

Employ­ers need to under­stand these bar­ri­ers and talk to employee about how to over­come them. A good start is ask­ing ask open-ended ques­tions, be good lis­ten­ers and stay con­nected with injured employ­ees who are off the job. With­out that, the employee may not feel they owe you any loyalty.

Some other help­ful information:

From the Cana­dian Office of the Chief Human Resources Man­ager, the fol­low­ing fun­da­men­tals of a return-to-work plan offer guid­ance in its creation.

A return-to-work plan is a tool for man­agers to proac­tively help ill or injured employ­ees return to pro­duc­tive employ­ment in a timely and safe manner:

  • A num­ber of employ­ees can safely per­form pro­duc­tive and mean­ing­ful work while they are recovering.
  • Return­ing to work is ben­e­fi­cial to the employee and is part of the recov­ery process.
  • Dif­fer­ent sit­u­a­tions require dif­fer­ent solutions.

The pri­or­ity is to return the employee to the posi­tion he or she held prior to the absence. In this way, the employee can return to his or her rou­tines, work­place and co-workers. If this is not pos­si­ble, how­ever, other alter­na­tives, in order of desir­abil­ity, are to return the employee to:

  • A mod­i­fied job in the same workplace;
  • A dif­fer­ent job in the same workplace;
  • A sim­i­lar job in a dif­fer­ent work­place; or
  • A dif­fer­ent job in a dif­fer­ent workplace.

Return-to-work plans are intended to be tran­si­tional and have a fixed dura­tion. Per­ma­nent actions are defined as accom­mo­da­tion. Return-to-work plans must include the fol­low­ing information:

  • The employee’s objec­tives, to be met grad­u­ally until he or she achieves the final goal of fully resum­ing the job tasks per­formed before the absence, or, alter­nately, start­ing the new job if return­ing to the for­mer posi­tion was not pos­si­ble. The employee’s abil­i­ties, func­tional lim­i­ta­tions and restric­tions are taken into account and are to be adjusted accord­ing to the employee’s progress;
  • The action required to meet these objec­tives includes the respon­si­bil­i­ties of the employee, the man­ager and all of the co-workers assigned to sup­port the employee;
  • The time frame to meet these objec­tives, which estab­lish the dead­line for mea­sur­ing the employee’s progress. It is impor­tant for the plan to have a start and end date. Time frames and expec­ta­tions must respect the employee’s abil­i­ties, be clearly stated for the dura­tion of the plan and be revised as needed;
  • To the extent pos­si­ble, absences for med­ical check­ups must meet the return-to-work plan imple­men­ta­tion requirements;
  • The return-to-work date and agreed work schedule;
  • If applic­a­ble, all action to be taken to mit­i­gate iden­ti­fied bar­ri­ers, e.g., spe­cial equip­ment, required train­ing; and
  • The sig­na­ture of the employee and the manager.

Source: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hrh/dmi-igi/fundamentals-fondements/rtwp-prt-eng.asp

 

Should you disclose mental health issues at work?

Smart Com­pany today pro­duced an arti­cle on the topic of dis­clos­ing men­tal health issues at work. Some of the key issues were as follows:

  • Lead­ers need to build pos­i­tive atti­tudes and sup­port mech­a­nisms for any staff impacted or likely to be by depres­sion, bipo­lar dis­or­der and other men­tal health prob­lems. We need to remove the stigma and make all staff feel com­fort­able about who they are. It’s much bet­ter to work for a com­pany that has employee well-being at the fore­front of their con­cerns and a proac­tive approach. It is a duty of care.
  • Depres­sion and men­tal health prob­lems are big work issues and we need to under­stand the impact on work and the asso­ci­ated stress trig­gers. How tragic that any­one would feel so bad they would want to end their life? And yet one in five peo­ple will suf­fer from depres­sion at some stage in their lives, and this can lead to time off for vary­ing amounts of time. We must have empa­thy for such a com­mon situation.
  • Peo­ple who are work­ing well and get­ting through each day may have com­part­men­talised what­ever else they are expe­ri­enc­ing in their lives for the sake of their reg­u­lar employ­ment and pro­mo­tion chances. You would be wise not to pre­sume, how­ever, that such peo­ple always “have it together”.

Source: http://www.smartcompany.com.au/people/43321-should-you-disclose-mental-health-issues-at-work.html

Adding to these issues, con­sider the fol­low­ing from the Cana­dian Men­tal Health Asso­ci­a­tion:

  • The good news is that men­tal ill­nesses are treat­able. Early recog­ni­tion of men­tal health prob­lems, refer­rals to the right resources (such as Employee and Fam­ily Assis­tance Plans), and ade­quate treat­ment can help peo­ple get on the path to recov­ery and go back to their usual work quickly. Employ­ees can and do reach their full poten­tial when they have the right sup­ports in their life, includ­ing those at their work­place. Some men­tal health prob­lems in the work­place can also be pre­vented when orga­ni­za­tions take steps to cre­ate men­tally healthy work­places for all employees.
  • Telling a super­vi­sor or mem­ber of your workplace’s human resources team about a diag­no­sis of any health prob­lem is called dis­clo­sure. In Canada, the law says that you don’t have to tell your employ­ers what is caus­ing a dis­abil­ity. You do need to say that you’re expe­ri­enc­ing health chal­lenges and you have to describe what you need to work well. Your employer may need infor­ma­tion from your health care provider around your abil­i­ties and dif­fi­cul­ties, but they don’t need your diagnosis.
  • There are risks and ben­e­fits to dis­clos­ing your expe­ri­ence of a men­tal ill­ness. If you do dis­close, you and your super­vi­sor may fig­ure out strate­gies that help you stay at work. For exam­ple, you may change the way you com­plete tasks or change the tasks you do. These strate­gies are also called accom­mo­da­tions. By law, work­places have to try to look at rea­son­able accom­mo­da­tions for any­one who expe­ri­ences a dis­abil­ity, includ­ing a men­tal ill­ness. Dis­clos­ing may help other peo­ple in your work­place under­stand any changes or dif­fi­cul­ties that they’ve noticed.
  • On the other hand, dis­clos­ing can lead to stigma or dis­crim­i­na­tion. Unfor­tu­nately, being open about a men­tal ill­ness can impact a person’s posi­tion at a work­place or their abil­ity to find a new job. There are laws to pre­vent this kind of dis­crim­i­na­tion, but it can still hap­pen. Work­places have dif­fer­ent atti­tudes and cul­tures, so every­one will have dif­fer­ent expe­ri­ences. How­ever, it’s best to think through all the options before you make a decision.
  • Deci­sions around stay­ing at work or tak­ing time off are influ­enced by many dif­fer­ent fac­tors, includ­ing the nature and sever­ity of the ill­ness and how the ill­ness affects your abil­i­ties to work. Ulti­mately, the choice should be between you, your care team, and your employer. Some peo­ple ben­e­fit from time off with a grad­ual return to work. Oth­ers may decide to work fewer hours. Some may stay at their cur­rent work­ing hours. Stay­ing con­nected to work can be help­ful dur­ing recov­ery. It can be a place to con­tribute your skills, build social con­nec­tions, con­tribute to some­thing big­ger, and earn a pay­cheque. A job can be part of how you see your­self. Talk with your care team for ideas and strate­gies that sup­port your work goals.

Source: Cana­dian Men­tal Health Association

 

Improving RTW rates

The cost of employee absence to our econ­omy is of such stag­ger­ing num­bers (Canada Lost $16.6 Bil­lion accord­ing to the Con­fer­ence Board of Canada. This equates to the aver­age worker being absent almost two full work weeks rang­ing from time off for minor ill­nesses to longer-term leaves of absence).

Absen­teeism is more than a human resources issue. Unless orga­ni­za­tions start proac­tively address­ing absen­teeism, this trend will most likely accel­er­ate as the work­force ages,” said Nicole Stew­art, author of Miss­ing in Action: Absen­teeism Trends in Cana­dian Orga­ni­za­tions. “Orga­ni­za­tions can begin to address the issues through bet­ter track­ing of the num­ber of absences and rea­sons for absenteeism.”

From other Con­fer­ence Board of Canada conclusions:

  • The aver­age absen­teeism rate in 2011 was 9.3 days per full-time employee. The pub­lic sec­tor absen­teeism rate was higher than that of the pri­vate sector.
  • Despite the enor­mous cost of absen­teeism, less than half of Cana­dian orga­ni­za­tions cur­rently track employee absences.
  • Absen­teeism rates were high­est in the health care and social assis­tance sec­tor, fol­lowed by gov­ern­ment and pub­lic administration.
  • The eco­nomic losses iden­ti­fied in the study do not con­sider any indi­rect costs that might also affect orga­ni­za­tions, such as replace­ment costs for absent work­ers, admin­is­tra­tive expenses, or neg­a­tive effects on other work­ers or customers.

Early inter­ven­tion dra­mat­i­cally improves return to work rates (RTW) but requires an in-depth under­stand­ing through­out an orga­ni­za­tion about the ser­vices their employ­ees can access, their role in sup­port­ing return­ing employ­ees and the crit­i­cal part they have to play in ensur­ing absence man­age­ment best prac­tice in their organization.

Reduc­ing the cost of absence for an orga­ni­za­tion is cer­tainly pos­si­ble and does not nec­es­sar­ily equate to sig­nif­i­cantly increased spend­ing how­ever. And any spend­ing is typ­i­cally off­set with higher returns in the areas of pro­duc­tiv­ity, reduced con­flict, fewer absences, etc.

One key solu­tion is a dis­abil­ity man­age­ment pro­gram offer­ing the full, inte­grated spec­trum of RTW ser­vices. As described Home­wood Health’s own dis­abil­ity man­age­ment offering:

Effec­tive return-to-work sup­port must go beyond ‘man­ag­ing’ dis­abil­ity to include an exten­sive vari­ety of tools for today’s com­plex claims. Home­wood Health™ offers access in a timely man­ner to a full suite of ser­vices. Our com­pre­hen­sive con­tin­uum of care pro­vides high qual­ity adju­di­ca­tion and claims man­age­ment sup­ported by access to inde­pen­dent psy­cho­log­i­cal eval­u­a­tions, spe­cial­ized inpatient/outpatient treat­ment options to sup­port recov­ery and avail­abil­ity of facil­i­ta­tion, and con­flict man­age­ment at work. Home­wood Health™ pro­vides research-based outcome-driven sup­port for employ­ees. Our treat­ment focus is always to sup­port a sus­tain­able return to health and a timely return to work after ill­ness and/or injury.

We apply a team approach to treat­ment plan­ning. Home­wood psy­chi­a­trists work with the treat­ing physi­cian to ensure best results for timely and suc­cess­ful return to work. Occu­pa­tional health pro­fes­sion­als exam­ine func­tion work­ing with psy­chol­o­gists and psy­chi­a­trists for suc­cess­ful return to work.

Our dis­abil­ity man­age­ment model helps to reduce the cost of absence by increas­ing the like­li­hood of sus­tained and suc­cess­ful return to work for both short-term dis­abil­ity (STD) and long-term dis­abil­ity (LTD) claims. With our model we rec­og­nize that it is crit­i­cal that treat­ment incor­po­rates strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion in order to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

We do this by using a more com­pre­hen­sive multi-disciplinary team approach. Our team of health pro­fes­sion­als is com­prised of psy­chi­a­trists, occu­pa­tional health pro­fes­sion­als, case man­agers, psy­chol­o­gists, physi­cians and spe­cial­ized clin­i­cians who work together to pos­i­tively alter func­tion­ing and clin­i­cal outcomes.

This approach has strong out­comes in res­o­lu­tion of more chronic sit­u­a­tions, in par­tic­u­lar LTD claims that require a full review, team plan­ning and a new approach to resolv­ing issues that have neg­a­tively impacted return to health and work readi­ness. Our team looks at all fac­tors that sup­port and man­age recov­ery. This includes work­place inter­ven­tions that remove bar­ri­ers to return to work through facil­i­ta­tion, return prepa­ra­tion, and longer-term sup­port for return­ing employ­ees such as relapse pre­ven­tion and after care.

For more infor­ma­tion about resolv­ing your chal­lenges with employee absence and dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, or any other issues relat­ing to the men­tal health of employ­ees, addic­tions, or improv­ing employee and work­place well-being, feel free to con­tact Home­wood Health.

 


 

About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

 

 

 

Open plan offices rates as ‘unhealthiest’ work environments

Find­ings from a recent Canada research fojnd that over a quar­ter of employ­ees say their work­ing envi­ron­ment pro­motes stress.

When asked to rank how easy it was to be healthy in their work­ing environment:

  • employ­ees scored their work­places an aver­age of 6.3 out of 10,
  • open plan offices received a 6.1 rating
  • employ­ees who mostly worked from home rat­ing their envi­ron­ment at 8.1.
  • Many office-based work­ers favoured the idea of out­side areas in the work­place as well as health ben­e­fits, with a third of pri­vate office work­ers (33%) and 32% of open plan office work­ers say­ing they would like an out­side seat­ing area to get fresh air or stretch their legs.
  • Office work­ing also appeared to encour­age unhealthy eat­ing pat­terns, with 19% admit­ting to eat­ing lunch at their desk as they did not have time to eat a proper lunch.
  • 28% of respon­dents work­ing in open plan offices said that their work­ing envi­ron­ment caused stress (5% of home work­ers say­ing this was the case).
  • The find­ings also indi­cated that office work­ing envi­ron­ments were more likely to induce headaches and other ill­nesses, with over a third (34%) of employ­ees in open plan offices say­ing that they suf­fered from a lack of fresh air.

When asked about pos­si­ble solutions:

  •  38% of respon­dents said they would like to have healthy liv­ing or weight loss clubs available
  • 22% said they would like to see an employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­gram offered.

Canada Life mar­ket­ing direc­tor Paul Avis commented:

We spend the major­ity of our time at work, so it’s not sur­pris­ing that the type of envi­ron­ment you work in can have such a sig­nif­i­cant impact on your health and well­be­ing. Employ­ers have a duty to ensure they are pro­vid­ing an appro­pri­ate and com­fort­able work­space and encour­age their employ­ees to take reg­u­lar breaks away from their desks. With ill­ness already prone to spread­ing in office envi­ron­ments, it’s cru­cial to offer a work­space that cul­ti­vates good health and well­be­ing rather than dam­ages it. It’s par­tic­u­larly con­cern­ing that a quar­ter of employ­ees feel their men­tal well­be­ing is being neg­a­tively affected by their work envi­ron­ment: stress is a major cause of long-term absence and can be hugely detri­men­tal to both employee and employer.”

 


About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

 

Do clients focus too much on wellness ROI?

Do clients focus too much on well­ness ROI?

From the article:

From an employer’s stand­point, when employ­ees suf­fer from chronic dis­eases, both pro­duc­tiv­ity and oppor­tu­ni­ties are lost in terms of:

  • increased employee absenteeism;
  • increased dis­abil­ity;
  • increased acci­dents;
  • reduced work­place effec­tive­ness; and
  • neg­a­tive impacts on work qual­ity or cus­tomer service.

While well­ness pro­grams are valu­able tools to pro­mote healthy lifestyles and to improve the work­place envi­ron­ment, nail­ing the data and ROI is elu­sive. There is lit­tle short­age in stud­ies north and south of the 49th par­al­lel, but how this data is inter­preted and how it is over­laid on the par­tic­u­lar work­force is crit­i­cal to suc­cess. Real­is­ti­cally, employ­ers should use com­mon sense in mak­ing the well­ness deci­sion. Some ele­ment of trial and error will be crit­i­cal because chang­ing behav­iour is no easy task.

Read the full arti­cle here, includ­ing extrap­o­la­tion of study data to the Cana­dian context.

 


About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

Federal executives plead for assistance with stress and depression

The Asso­ci­a­tion of Pro­fes­sional Exec­u­tives of the Pub­lic Ser­vice of Canada (APEX) is urg­ing the gov­ern­ment to adopt the Men­tal Health Commission’s national stan­dard for psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety in the work­place, along with ways to mea­sure progress in pro­mot­ing men­tal health in the pub­lic service.

This plea comes in the wake of APEX’s most recent study of the health of the government’s 6,560 exec­u­tives which is a sur­pris­ing reminder of how psy­cho­log­i­cally and phys­i­cally chal­leng­ing a work­place envi­ron­ment lack­ing psy­cho­log­i­cal health strate­gies can be:

  • the work­place was mak­ing some of 6500 of the government’s exec­u­tives sick;
  • the orga­ni­za­tional com­mit­ment of these exec­u­tives is on the decline;
  • 32% of exec­u­tives are dis­en­gaged, feel­ing dis­con­nected from their work and unable to deal with the jobs’ demands;
  • the exec­u­tives are more stressed than 75 per cent of Canadians;
  • the exec­u­tives feel they have lit­tle con­trol over their work, receive lit­tle sup­port from col­leagues and super­vi­sors and get scant recog­ni­tion for their efforts;
  • com­plaints abounded about inci­vil­ity in the work­place and harass­ing bosses;
  • approx­i­mately 25% of the exec­u­tives reported symp­toms of burnout, rang­ing from emo­tional exhaus­tion to cyn­i­cism and a declin­ing sense of accom­plish­ment and usefulness.

APEX made its rec­om­men­da­tions to Privy Coun­cil Clerk Wayne Wouters, who launched his Blue­print 2020 a year ago for input on the future pub­lic ser­vice. His final report, called Des­ti­na­tion 2020, is expected soon.

Lisanne Lacroix, APEX’s chief exec­u­tive offi­cer, said the orga­ni­za­tional health of depart­ments and agen­cies is crit­i­cal to the psy­cho­log­i­cal health of employ­ees. She said unman­aged work stress has a “neg­a­tive impact” on the health of employ­ees, which in turn affects the effec­tive­ness and pro­duc­tiv­ity of organizations.

For more, read the source: Ottawa Cit­i­zen

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Health. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Keeping Our Customers Fit and Healthy, Away From Home

Con­grat­u­la­tions to our Orga­ni­za­tional Well­ness Team!

Dur­ing a two-day event in Feb­ru­ary, our Home­wood Health Orga­ni­za­tional Well­ness team launched a large employer’s cus­tomized health and well­ness pro­gram. The project was specif­i­cally designed for the employ­ees reach their health and well­ness goals.

The Orga­ni­za­tional Well­ness team engaged with employ­ees look­ing to address a vari­ety of health and well­ness issues rang­ing from nutri­tion and fit­ness, to coun­selling and coach­ing. The pro­gram was sup­ported through our long-standing EFAP, as well as the inte­gra­tion of Per­sonal Train­ing and Health Coaching

Employ­ees enthu­si­as­ti­cally embraced the pro­gram and were sur­prised by the num­ber of spe­cial­ity pro­grams avail­able. Shift­work, smok­ing ces­sa­tion and nutri­tional coun­selling were among the hot top­ics dri­ving employ– ees to make health­ier choices.

We received com­ments such as:

“This is so cool, when can I start!?”

“The [pro­gram] makes my ben­e­fits approach­able and easy to understand”

This remark­able event reflects our team’s com­mit­ment to ‘accel­er­at­ing our rev­enue growth’ by expand­ing the scope of ser­vices we offer clients and tai­lor­ing pro­grams to meet their spe­cific needs.

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Mental health issues in the workplace a growing concern for Canadian employers (report)

In this timely report released yes­ter­day on PR Newsire, Cana­dian employer data is col­lected and ana­lyzed to show that EAPs “Cana­di­ans’ qual­ity of life, reduce the eco­nomic chal­lenges of reduced pro­duc­tiv­ity in the work­place and ease the pres­sure on the health­care system.”
In today’s age, a stag­ger­ing one in five Cana­di­ans strug­gle with the bur­den of men­tal health issues such as stress, anx­i­ety and depres­sion, among oth­ers.1 The every­day chal­lenges that these indi­vid­u­als expe­ri­ence puts a sig­nif­i­cant strain on not only their per­sonal, but also their pro­fes­sional lives. Employ­ers con­tinue to grap­ple with the impacts of men­tal health issues in the work­place and to iden­tify the best means of sup­port­ing their employ­ees — enter Employee Assis­tance Pro­grams (EAPs).

EAPs pro­vide employ­ees with coun­selling and refer­ral ser­vices to help them cope with men­tal health issues, which are the lead­ing cause of long-term dis­abil­ity, and a major cause of short-term dis­abil­ity, con­flict at work and absence. In fact, in an aver­age week, more than 500,000 Cana­di­ans will not go to work because of men­tal ill­ness.2,3 While EAPs are an impor­tant means of pro­vid­ing assis­tance to address a wide vari­ety of prob­lems, the ques­tion remains, how well known and under­stood are these pro­grams among the Cana­dian workforce?

We’ve long known that coun­selling and sup­port ser­vices, like those offered by employee assis­tance pro­grams, improve the lives of those strug­gling under the weight of dif­fi­cult men­tal health issues such as  anx­i­ety and depres­sion,” says Allan Stordy, Pres­i­dent and CEO of Arete Human Resources Inc. (AHRI), a lead­ing national provider of EAPs, unique busi­ness assis­tance pro­grams (BAPs) and the com­mis­sion­ers of the study. “But now we can link these pos­i­tive results to a very real cost sav­ings for employ­ers and our pub­licly funded health care system.”

Accord­ing to the study, sig­nif­i­cant improve­ments in men­tal health were seen in indi­vid­u­als with access to an EAP with reduc­tions in depres­sion, anx­i­ety and stress lev­els three months after the last coun­selling ses­sion. After EAP use, pub­lic health care uti­liza­tion relat­ing to spe­cial­ist vis­its was reduced. Fur­ther, the study found that reduced work pro­duc­tiv­ity and sig­nif­i­cant employer costs observed at intake high­lighted an orga­ni­za­tional need for the ser­vices. At time of intake, 66 per cent of par­tic­i­pants had per­for­mance issues that pro­duced an esti­mated aver­age eco­nomic loss of $1,063 in the last four weeks for employ­ers. This trans­lated into an aver­age annual loss per par­tic­i­pant of almost $13,000 asso­ci­ated with absen­teeism and presenteeism.

As an employer, our main pri­or­ity is to help our employ­ees main­tain a suit­able work-life bal­ance and pro­vide them with nec­es­sary sup­ports when they have chal­lenges in their lives that affect their work per­for­mance,” says Peter Strat­ton, Chief Peo­ple Offi­cer at West­ern Finan­cial Group. “Insti­tut­ing an EAP has enabled us to play an enhanced role in con­tribut­ing to the over­all well-being of our employ­ees, par­tic­u­larly dur­ing last summer’s flood in Alberta. This pro­gram is a crit­i­cal part of our employee ben­e­fit pro­gram and one which is well-respected by our West­ern staff.”

Indi­vid­ual, employer and social out­comes all con­tribute to improved work­place men­tal health. Through EAPs, pos­i­tive impacts involv­ing all stake­hold­ers are achiev­able. Prior to enter­ing the EAP pro­gram 66 per cent of all study par­tic­i­pants reported hav­ing mod­er­ate, severe or extremely severe prob­lems with stress, anx­i­ety or depres­sion. Three months after com­plet­ing the coun­selling pro­gram less than 32 per cent fell into these same categories.

Liv­ing with Men­tal Health Issues
Men­tal ill­ness can affect any­one, no mat­ter the age, gen­der or race. Liv­ing with men­tal ill­ness presents a sig­nif­i­cant bur­den for indi­vid­u­als and their family/friends, largely due to the fear and stig­mas asso­ci­ated with the con­di­tion. Inter­est­ingly, a mere 50 per cent of Cana­di­ans are open with friends or co-workers about a fam­ily mem­ber with a men­tal ill­ness in com­par­i­son to 72 per cent who openly dis­cuss a diag­no­sis of can­cer, for instance.4 Also of note is that 20 per cent of Cana­di­ans will per­son­ally expe­ri­ence a men­tal ill­ness dur­ing their life­time; how­ever, main­tain­ing good men­tal health is equally as impor­tant as main­tain­ing good phys­i­cal health.5

About the Study
Inves­ti­gat­ing the global value of a Cana­dian Employee Assis­tance Pro­gram is the first of its kind to exam­ine the eco­nomic and social impact of men­tal health chal­lenges and the value being pro­vided by EAPs in help­ing peo­ple man­age these issues. A sam­ple of Cana­dian employ­ees was vol­un­tar­ily tracked before and three months after access to AHRI’s EAP ser­vices Arive® and Acumin®.

Ref­er­ences


1 Smetanin, P., Stiff, D., Bri­ante, C., Adair, C., Ahmad, S., & Khan, M. (2011). The list and eco­nomic impact of major men­tal ill­nesses in Canada: 2011 to 2041., Risk­An­a­lyt­ica, on behalf of the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada.
2 Cal­cu­lated from data in Dewa, Chau, and Der­mer (2010), “Exam­in­ing the Com­par­a­tive Inci­dence and Costs of Phys­i­cal and Men­tal Health-Related Dis­abil­i­ties in an Employed Pop­u­la­tion,” and Sta­tis­tics Canada employ­ment data.
3 Cal­cu­lated from data in Insti­tute of Health Eco­nom­ics (2007), “Men­tal Health Eco­nom­ics Sta­tis­tics in Your Pocket,” and Sta­tis­tics Canada — Labour Sta­tis­tics Divi­sion (2011), “Work Absence Rates 2010.“
4 Cana­dian Med­ical Asso­ci­a­tion (2008). 8th Annual National Report Card on Health Care.
5 Pub­lic Health Agency of Canada. A Report on Men­tal Ill­nesses in Canada. http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/miic-mmac/chap_1-eng.php. Accessed Jan­u­ary 2014.

Source Report (PDF For­mat): Down­load here

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.