Investing in Employees’ Health Leads to Increased Productivity

An annual gain of 10 hours in pro­duc­tive time for work­ers who improve health!
Work­place health pro­mo­tion pro­grams that improve employee health can lead to sig­nif­i­cant increases in pro­duc­tiv­ity — and asso­ci­ated cost sav­ings, reports a study in the Octo­ber Jour­nal of Occu­pa­tional and Envi­ron­men­tal Med­i­cine, offi­cial pub­li­ca­tion of the Amer­i­can Col­lege of Occu­pa­tional and Envi­ron­men­tal Med­i­cine (ACOEM).“Participating in health pro­mo­tion pro­grams can help improve pro­duc­tiv­ity lev­els among employ­ees and save money for their employ­ers,” accord­ing to the study by Rebecca J. Mitchell, MPH, and col­leagues of OptumHealth, Golden Val­ley, Minn.The researchers ana­lyzed the pro­duc­tiv­ity effects of a pro­gram in which well­ness coaches pro­vided tele­phone sup­port to help employ­ees address health prob­lems or risks. The study used mea­sures of lost work time includ­ing absen­teeism as well as “pre­sen­teeism” — time spent at work with reduced productivity.The pro­gram led to sig­nif­i­cant reduc­tions in lost work time — equiv­a­lent to about 10.3 hours in addi­tional pro­duc­tive time per year. Sav­ings aver­aged about $350 per par­tic­i­pat­ing employee, com­pared to sim­i­lar work­ers who did not par­tic­i­pate in the well­ness program.

The sav­ings were even greater for employ­ees who suc­cess­fully improved their health or low­ered health risk in at least one area. For a typ­i­cal employee, the gain in pro­duc­tive time amounted to about 0.5 percent.

Effec­tive health pro­mo­tion pro­grams lead to sav­ings in med­ical and absen­teeism costs. The new results “add to the grow­ing body of evi­dence that invest­ing in a healthy work­force can help to increase pro­duc­tiv­ity lev­els of employ­ees,” Ms. Mitchell and coau­thors con­clude. How­ever, they add, “It takes time and com­mit­ment for pro­gram par­tic­i­pa­tion to yield success.”

Cita­tion — Mitchell RJ, Ozminkowski RJ, Serxner S. Improv­ing employee pro­duc­tiv­ity through improved health. J Occup Env­i­ron Med. 2013;55(10):1142–8.

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Just released: Mental Health Commission of Canada announces further work on workplace health

Released Jan 16 by PR Newswire comes some great news for work­place men­tal health.

TORONTO, Jan. 15, 2014 /CNW/ — Fol­low­ing the suc­cess­ful launch one year ago of the world’s first National Stan­dard for Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety in the Work­place, the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada (MHCC) is announc­ing plans to fur­ther work with Cana­dian busi­nesses and drive uptake of the Stan­dard in work­places across Canada.

Busi­ness, labour lead­ers and the Gov­ern­ment of Canada will join the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada and host Valerie Pringle as well as employ­ers from across the Cana­dian work­force for the announcement.

In one short year, the Com­mis­sion has received an over­whelm­ing response to the Stan­dard, with Cana­dian busi­nesses eager to sign on,” said Louise Bradley, MHCC Pres­i­dent and CEO. “With roughly half a mil­lion Cana­di­ans miss­ing work each week due to men­tal ill­ness, Cana­dian employ­ers know it’s time to invest in a psy­cho­log­i­cally safe work­place. This new research project is a chance to drive momen­tum for work­place men­tal health across Canada.”

The event, hosted by MHCC and its part­ners, CSA Group (CSA) and Bureau de nor­mal­i­sa­tion du Québec (BNQ), will be mul­ti­fac­eted and will involve an announce­ment by the MHCC and its part­ners as well as reveal uptake of the Stan­dard over the past year.  Over 15 busi­nesses of all shapes and sizes will be avail­able to dis­cuss their expe­ri­ences with the Stan­dard and expec­ta­tions as to how the announce­ment will affect their work­place.  Sep­a­rate announce­ments by pri­vate sec­tor par­tic­i­pants will also take place dur­ing the event.

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Homewood Human Solutions wins Strategic Partnership Award

Home­wood Human Solu­tions is proud to announce receiv­ing the Strate­gic Part­ner­ship Award for our work with the City of Cal­gary on its bet­ter sleep campaign.

The Strate­gic Part­ner­ship Award, pre­sented by Ben­e­fits Canada as part of the Ben­e­fits Canada Work­place Health and Ben­e­fits Awards 2013 pro­gram, rec­og­nizes employ­ers (City of Cal­gary) who have worked with a sup­port­ing orga­ni­za­tion (Home­wood Human Solu­tions) to develop “inno­v­a­tive and effec­tive ben­e­fits initiatives.”

Theawards bring together the best of the indus­try and rec­og­nize only those orga­ni­za­tions that are com­mit­ted to sus­tain­able health­care and that achieve best prac­tices in the com­mu­ni­ties [served].” — Ben­e­fits Canada

Con­grat­u­la­tions to all involved in this most suc­cess­ful health improve­ment cam­paign and inno­v­a­tive work­ing relationship!

More about the awards here.

 

Employers play a critical role in de-stigmatizing mental illness

In the Octo­ber 2013 issue of Ben­e­fits Canada our own Judith Plotkin pro­vides com­men­tary on the crit­i­cal role employ­ers play in de-stigmatizing men­tal illness.

From the arti­cle, Judith notes:

Accord­ing to the Cana­dian Men­tal Health Asso­ci­a­tion (CMHA), stigma is a result of neg­a­tive stereo­types around men­tal ill­ness that con­tinue to be rein­forced in the media, which often depict the men­tally ill as vio­lent and unpre­dictable. In the work­place, employ­ees view col­leagues liv­ing with men­tal health con­di­tions with sus­pi­cion and ques­tion their capa­bil­i­ties, which can result in these employ­ees being over­looked for promotions.

A 2007 Ipsos Reid study found that 79% of North Amer­i­can work­ers think peo­ple would hide the fact that they had a men­tal ill­ness from their employ­ers to avoid hurt­ing poten­tial career oppor­tu­ni­ties. Almost 50% believe that if an employee is absent as a result of his or her men­tal ill­ness, he or she is likely to “get into trou­ble and maybe even fired.” And a sur­vey con­ducted in the United States found that more than half of employ­ers would be hes­i­tant to hire a per­son who is men­tally ill, while one-quarter would dis­miss an employee who had not dis­closed the ill­ness. It’s not sur­pris­ing, then, that the major­ity of peo­ple with a men­tal health con­di­tion keep quiet and don’t divulge their health sta­tus to their employers.

Depres­sion is the most preva­lent men­tal ill­ness. In fact, the World Health Orga­ni­za­tion has indi­cated that depres­sion is one of the world’s lead­ing causes of dis­abil­ity, with more than 350 mil­lion peo­ple of all ages cur­rently liv­ing with the ill­ness world­wide. For­tu­nately, depres­sion is extremely respon­sive to treatment—usually med­ica­tion, coun­selling or both. Once help is sought, 80% of peo­ple make pos­i­tive improve­ments allow­ing them to return to their reg­u­lar activ­i­ties, accord­ing to the CMHA. Yet many peo­ple do not seek help: they think they will sim­ply “snap out of it” or, because of the stigma, they are too embar­rassed to ask for it.

The longer depres­sion goes untreated, the harder it becomes to treat.

Depres­sion is also strik­ing younger and younger peo­ple: 3.2 mil­lion Cana­di­ans ages 12 to 19 are at risk for devel­op­ing depres­sion, accord­ing to the CMHA. In today’s increas­ingly com­pet­i­tive global econ­omy, Cana­dian busi­nesses can­not afford to lose skilled employ­ees in their prime work­ing years.

What the Num­bers Say

Judith quotes some dis­tress­ing num­bers in her com­men­tary. Specifically:

The 2011 Con­fer­ence Board of Canada study Build­ing Men­tally Healthy Work­places reveals the extent and preva­lence of men­tal health issues in the work­place. Of the more than 1,000 Cana­di­ans sur­veyed, 44% reported that they were cur­rently expe­ri­enc­ing (12%) or had pre­vi­ously expe­ri­enced (32%) a men­tal health issue. (This was based on a broad def­i­n­i­tion that included exces­sive stress, anx­i­ety, depres­sion, burnout, addic­tion and sub­stance abuse, mania, bipo­lar dis­or­der and schiz­o­phre­nia, among others.)

That sur­pris­ing fig­ure is behind esca­lat­ing ben­e­fits costs and dis­abil­ity claims. In the 2011 Con­fer­ence Board study, 78% of short-term dis­abil­ity claims and 67% of long-term dis­abil­ity claims in Canada were related to men­tal health issues. Cana­dian gov­ern­ment fig­ures show that more hos­pi­tal days are used by peo­ple with men­tal ill­nesses than are used by peo­ple with can­cer and heart dis­ease com­bined. A report by the Cana­dian Alliance on Men­tal Ill­ness and Men­tal Health stated that “depres­sion will be the sin­gle most expen­sive cause of lost work­place pro­duc­tiv­ity due to dis­abil­ity by 2020.” That’s just seven years away.

Eras­ing the Stigma

Judith notes “It’s not easy to change deeply entrenched atti­tudes toward men­tal ill­ness, but employ­ers can cer­tainly make inroads with their work­force. Doing so requires a corporate-wide strat­egy involv­ing lead­er­ship, man­age­r­ial skills, work­place cul­ture, and edu­ca­tion and communication.”

Four areas of focus in eras­ing stigma are, all of which need to be reviewed, sus­tained and reg­u­larly refined over time.according to main­tain the effec­tive­ness of ongo­ing men­tal health ini­tia­tives in eras­ing stigma and pro­mot­ing good men­tal health. Judith iden­ti­fies these areas as follows:

Lead­er­ship.

Change begins at the top; there­fore, endorse­ment and sup­port from senior lead­ers is essen­tial. Top man­age­ment must demon­strate lead­er­ship not only in pro­mot­ing good men­tal health but also in sup­port­ing employ­ees who are expe­ri­enc­ing men­tal health chal­lenges. Active endorse­ment and sup­port from unions and other employee asso­ci­a­tions also helps trans­form ideas into action.

Man­age­r­ial skills.

Man­agers are on the front lines of orga­ni­za­tional health and well-being. Not only are they able to iden­tify pro­duc­tiv­ity and behav­ioural issues early, they’re also instru­men­tal in sup­port­ing and accom­mo­dat­ing team mem­bers with phys­i­cal and men­tal ill­nesses and chal­lenges. Man­agers often set the tone for their team and directly influ­ence lev­els of stigma. While some man­agers are well informed about men­tal health issues, they often feel ill-equipped to dis­cuss these issues with employ­ees.  Pro­vid­ing appro­pri­ate and ongo­ing train­ing for man­agers at all lev­els to help them deal with men­tal health issues and under­stand how they can guide employ­ees to the appro­pri­ate resources is one of the most impor­tant ini­tia­tives that an orga­ni­za­tion can under­take. Most employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams (EFAPs) offer this training.

Work­place culture.

Cre­at­ing an orga­ni­za­tional cul­ture that is truly inclu­sive and sup­port­ive of all employ­ees takes time but begins sim­ply by ask­ing a few ques­tions. Is there a company-wide pol­icy in place to pro­mote good men­tal and phys­i­cal health in the work­place? In addi­tion to pre­ven­tive mea­sures, there should be poli­cies and pro­to­cols in place that sup­port an employee with a men­tal ill­ness to return to work or stay at work. The work­place offers many pos­i­tive oppor­tu­ni­ties and resources that can help employ­ees recover or cope bet­ter: a sup­port­ive social net­work, feel­ings of self-worth, and access to EFAPs, return-to-work sup­port and other health and well­ness programs.

Edu­ca­tion and communication.

Edu­ca­tion is per­haps the most pow­er­ful weapon in fight­ing stereo­types or mis­in­for­ma­tion. Employ­ers can increase men­tal health lit­er­acy through work­shops, sem­i­nars, and lunch and learns, as well as through printed and web-based arti­cles and per­sonal sto­ries. Man­agers need to encour­age team mem­bers to par­tic­i­pate in edu­ca­tion and train­ing ses­sions and can fur­ther show their com­mit­ment by attend­ing these ses­sions with their direct reports. The company’s EFAP—as well as orga­ni­za­tions such as the CMHA, the Mood Dis­or­ders Soci­ety of Canada and the Cana­dian Health Network—can also pro­vide a wealth of mate­ri­als and support.

The impor­tance of men­tal health benefits

Finally, Judith notes:

In Canada’s health­care sys­tem, indi­vid­u­als who seek care for men­tal health issues typ­i­cally rely on an often-confusing array of providers, and nav­i­gat­ing these providers to find appro­pri­ate care is a chal­lenge. While men­tal ill­ness is an increas­ing cost dri­ver for employ­ers, pro­grams have not kept up with the spi­ralling needs of today’s employees.”

The impor­tance of robust men­tal health ben­e­fits as part of an organization’s over­all approach to health will become increas­ingly impor­tant. Many employ­ees find that get­ting help is just too hard, and some aren’t aware of the resources avail­able to them. Employ­ees need to know the ben­e­fits and ser­vices that their employer offers. This com­mu­ni­ca­tion should be an ongo­ing part of an organization’s over­all men­tal health ben­e­fits strat­egy. EFAPs, psy­cho­log­i­cal and psy­chi­atric con­sul­ta­tions, men­tal health assess­ments, com­plex claims sup­port from men­tal health pro­fes­sion­als, and work­place facil­i­ta­tion and medi­a­tion pro­grams are all ele­ments of a com­pre­hen­sive approach.

Judith Plotkin is vice-president, strate­gic oper­a­tions, with Home­wood Human Solutions.

For a PDF from Ben­e­fits Canada, click here.

Orig­i­nal source arti­cle here.

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Improving worker health: Conference report. Part 2

The fol­low­ing infor­ma­tion is sourced from the APA Mon­i­tor report on the 10th Inter­na­tional Con­fer­ence on Occu­pa­tional Stress and Health 2013.

As noted in yesterday’s blog­ging post

Peo­ple come to work with an under­stand­ing that they are going to fol­low direc­tions, take instruc­tions, be part of a team and learn new skills…It’s really a per­fect place for health interventions.

So com­mented L. Casey Chose­wood, MD, senior med­ical offi­cer at NIOSH at the 10th Inter­na­tional Con­fer­ence on Occu­pa­tional Stress and Health that was held May 16–19 of this year. With more than 770 par­tic­i­pants from 39 coun­tries gath­ered in LA to dis­cuss the lat­est research on ways to improve worker health. This year’s theme: Pro­mot­ing and Pro­tect­ing Total Worker Health.

Orga­nized by the Amer­i­can Psy­cho­log­i­cal Asso­ci­a­tion (APA), National Insti­tute for Occu­pa­tional Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Soci­ety for Occu­pa­tional Health Psy­chol­ogy, the con­fer­ence brings together par­tic­i­pants work­ing towards shap­ing this grow­ing field.

Today’s blog is the sec­ond part of a two-part report on some high­lights we regard as crit­i­cal take-aways from the conference.

High­lights

1. Pro­mot­ing men­tal health in the workplace

Any improve­ment to men­tal health in the work­place must (1) com­bine reduc­ing work-related risk fac­tors for men­tal health prob­lems, (2) pro­mote pos­i­tive ele­ments of work, and (3) address men­tal health prob­lems among work­ing peo­ple regard­less of the under­ly­ing cause. So reports Anthony LaM­on­tagne, SCD of the Uni­ver­sity of Melbourne’s School of Pop­u­la­tion and Global Health in the open­ing ple­nary ses­sion. Anx­i­ety, depres­sion, and other men­tal health prob­lems were dis­cussed in their rela­tion­ship to work­ing con­di­tions. The main tenet being that any inter­ven­tion to improve men­tal health in the work­place needs to com­bine these three components.

a. Men­tal health inter­ven­tions should pro­mote pos­i­tive ele­ments of work.

Most peo­ple derive some mean­ing or sat­is­fac­tion from work…We don’t do a good enough job try­ing to build up the pos­i­tives” said LaM­on­tagne, fur­ther not­ing that peo­ple craw self-esteem and effi­cacy from their work, regard­less of the type of job.

b. Regard­less of cause (work, home, or some com­bi­na­tion thereof), employ­ers must address men­tal health prob­lems among their work­ing population.

By assist­ing employ­ees to seek pro­fes­sional help, the orga­ni­za­tion and the employee will benefit.

LaM­on­tagne notes that employ­ers have been fairly accept­ing of work­place men­tal health pro­mo­tion pro­grams but these con­cerns stem pri­mar­ily from absen­teeism and pro­duc­tiv­ity issues. But less so when it comes to address­ing job stress issues. Rather than see this as an obsta­cle, LaM­on­tagne calls upon those of us con­cerned about address­ing men­tal health, job stress issues, and opti­miz­ing work prac­tices, to “ride on the coat­tails of men­tal health promotion.”

2. Job inse­cu­rity and acci­dent under-reporting

“Work­ers feel their jobs are inse­cure, they are less likely to report acci­dents and injuries.”

So hypoth­e­sizes Tahira Probst, PhD, from Wash­ing­ton State Uni­ver­sity. Probst stud­ies both job inse­cu­rity and the safety cli­mate of orga­ni­za­tions. She pre­sented results of a recent study inves­ti­gat­ing the inter­sec­tion of those two inter­ests. Three mil­lion work-related injuries and ill­nesses are reported in the United States each year, but some stud­ies have found more than three-quarters of work­place injuries go unreported.

After sur­vey­ing 1265 work­ers in 27 orga­ni­za­tions from a vari­ety of sec­tors, Probst con­firmed that as job secu­rity went down the num­ber of unre­ported injuries climbed. Whereas orga­ni­za­tions with a pos­i­tive safety cli­mate (e.g. reward­ing safe behav­iours, enact­ing food safety train­ing, mak­ing employ­ees feel com­fort­able rais­ing issues to man­agers) had lower rates of under-reporting.

In short, she demon­strated that a pos­i­tive safety cli­mate could over­come the effect of high job inse­cu­rity on acci­dent under-reporting.

And while not­ing that job secu­rity can’t always be improved, Probst com­mented that orga­ni­za­tions can always take steps to improve the company’s over­all com­mit­ment to safety.

3. The gap between pol­icy and practice

When it comes to for­mal poli­cies and man­age­ment stan­dards, organ­i­sa­tions may say one thing but do another…Companies may espouse excel­lent safety prac­tices but cut cor­ners in real­ity if those pro­ce­dures under­mine the bot­tom line…unsurprisingly employ­ees are quick to pick up on this ‘decou­pling’ of pol­icy and practice.

This, accord­ing to Dov Zohar, PhD, at Tech­nion Insti­tute in Haifa, Israel.

Zohor dis­cussed an inter­ven­tion designed to reduce the dis­crep­ancy between for­mal poli­cies and man­age­ment stan­dards (say­ing one thing while doing another).

Zohar ran­domly divided a heavy-industry man­u­fac­tur­ing com­pa­nys 28 depart­ments into con­trol and exper­i­men­tal groups. He asked work­ers in both groups to take sur­veys mea­sur­ing safety cli­mate, safety behav­ior, and teamwork.

Dur­ing the 12-week inter­ven­tion phase, super­vi­sors in the exper­i­men­tal group were given feed­back about the rat­ings they received from employ­ees who com­pleted these sur­veys. With coach­ing to help under­stand the feed­back and set goals for com­mu­ni­cat­ing with employ­ees, he found that safety mea­sures sig­nif­i­cantly improved in those depart­ments that received the feedback.

Zohar con­cluded that his study demon­strated the impor­tance of fre­quent com­mu­ni­ca­tion between super­vi­sors and work­ers and that such inter­ven­tions could improve safety cli­mates in any num­ber of orga­ni­za­tions and, quite pos­si­bly, extrap­o­late to areas other than safety (e.g. ethics cli­mate, diver­sity, etc).

4. Effec­tive­ness of job-search interventions

As employ­ment has risen in recent years, job-search train­ing pro­grams have flour­ished. Stud­ies have found large vari­a­tions in these pro­grams’ effec­tive­ness and few researchers are report­edly tak­ing a big-picture view of the literature.

Songqui Liu, PhD of Penn­syl­va­nia State Uni­ver­sity exam­ined 47 stud­ies of var­i­ous job-search inter­ven­tions to draw broad con­clu­sions about the ingre­di­ents of a suc­cess­ful pro­gram over­all find­ing the inter­ven­tions help­ful.  He com­mented “if you have a blend of [these] tech­niques in your train­ing pro­gram, you’re likely to see the max­i­mum benefits.”

How­ever, job seek­ers are diverse, includ­ing older work­ers who ay ben­e­fit from more pro­grams that teach skills such as using the tech­nol­ogy with skill.

Over­all, Liu found the inter­ven­tions were helpful:

  1. The odds of land­ing a job were 2.67 times higher for job seek­ers who par­tic­i­pated than those who did not.
  2. The most suc­cess­ful pro­grams com­bined skill devel­op­ment (e.g. cre­at­ing a resume, net­work­ing) and moti­va­tion enhance­ment (e.g. set­ting real­is­tic goals).
  3. Older work­ers may ben­e­fit from pro­grams that teach skills (e.g. using the inter­net effec­tively) whereas younger work­ers might get more out of pro­grams that teach net­work­ing or inter­view­ing tips.
  4. The results are not only applic­a­ble to job hunters and career coun­selors but any job-search train­ing pro­grams (e.g. community-based).

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Canadian (Veterans) PTSD App reviewed

PTSD Coach CanadaWe don’t typ­i­cally men­tion spe­cific apps on the Healthy Work­places blog, but this pos­i­tive event invites men­tion because it is a Cana­dian gov­ern­ment mHealth (mobile health) initiative.

Vet­er­ans Affairs Canada (VAC) has just released the smart­phone app “PTSD Coach Canada.” (Unfor­tu­nate tim­ing in the app name, given the change to the diag­nos­tic title in the new released DSM-5).

From the Google Play store:

Together with pro­fes­sional treat­ment, PTSD Coach Canada pro­vides you depend­able resources you can trust. If you have, or think you might have PTSD, this app is for you. Fam­ily and friends can also learn from this app. PTSD Coach Canada pro­vides you with infor­ma­tion and self-help tools based on research.

The PTSD Coach Canada app can help you learn about and man­age symp­toms that can occur after trauma. Fea­tures include:

* Reli­able infor­ma­tion on PTSD and treat­ments that work

* Tools for screen­ing and track­ing your symptoms

* Con­ve­nient, easy-to-use tools to help you han­dle stress symptoms

* Direct links to sup­port and help

* Always with you when you need it

First, we very much like that this app sig­nals recog­ni­tion from the Cana­dian gov­ern­ment of men­tal health issues, and tech­no­log­i­cal advances that are chang­ing the nature of client/treatment inter­ac­tions (i.e. mHealth).

From a design stand­point we like that is light on size (for fast first-time install), and has auto-updates that will com­mu­ni­cate with your device as changes are announced and/or made.

We also like that is avail­able on the iPhone and Android devices, but it is not iPad com­pat­i­ble, which excludes a large pop­u­la­tion of users. And con­sid­er­ing that many vet­er­ans are senior now with chal­lenged eye­sight, the small app screen of a smart­phone seems prohibitive.

From a con­tent perspective:

  • We like that the usage dis­claimer is com­pre­hen­sive and warns against self-diagnosis. But we don’t like that “dis­claimer” and “setup” are rolled into one. Upon first use we were not pre­pared for set­ting things up, and had expected a menu of choices or some kind of break to note the app was switch­ing gears to a new topic.
  • That said, we like that the setup notes that you need to imme­di­ately deter­mine friends, loved ones and health pro­fes­sion­als who can help when stressed, pic­tures you find com­fort­ing or funny, and songs that are relax­ing. The instruc­tions to do all of this though, are a bit con­fus­ing and rely upon a lot of user tech knowl­edge (min­i­mal knowl­edge, but knowl­edge just the same).
  • We def­i­nitely not fond of the dark grey back­ground and white con­trast­ing text colour pal­lette. That is kind of depressing.
  • We like the audio option for lis­ten­ing to each sec­tion (e.g. “What is PTSD?”)
  • We don’t like the typo­graph­i­cal errors
  • We very much like the self-assessment mea­sure that will pro­vide ongo­ing stor­age and recall of the user’s self-assessment results, and email a reminder when the assess­ment is due. This allows for track­ing over time that could, poten­tially, influ­ence treatment-seeking, progress report­ing, iden­ti­fy­ing set­backs, etc.
  • We don’t like the place­ment of “Sched­ule Assess­ments” as a but­ton on the menu that is pre­sented after the orig­i­nal assess­ment. That orig­i­nal assess­ment asks if you want to do the sched­ul­ing and gives you options, and then this same but­ton ask the same information.
  • We find the tools for man­ag­ing PTSD of great vari­ety, easy to use, and quite inter­est­ing. For exam­ple, pos­i­tive imagery using your pre-selected calm­ing image and audio. Bet­ter still, these tools are cat­e­go­rized accord­ing to dif­fer­ent symp­toms (e.g. worried/anxious man­age­ment tools ver­sus anger man­age­ment tools).
  • We very much like the under­ly­ing treat­ment mes­sage which sup­ports cog­ni­tive behav­ioural type ther­a­pies, some­times com­bined with medication(s).
  • And we very much like the “Find Sup­port” area that uti­lizes the user’s own iden­ti­fied sup­port net­work as well as assis­tance con­tact­ing the Vet­er­ans Affairs Assis­tance Line.
  • We ques­tion, over­all, whether this app will be use­ful for the pub­lic, con­sid­er­ing the sup­port num­bers pro­vided. How­ever all other sec­tions are applic­a­ble. And there is an option men­tioned for non-Veterans con­tact assis­tance (9–1-1 but under­stand­ably noth­ing more specific).

————————————————————————————

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!


Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

 

Free webinar! Action Guide re: Psychological Health and Safety

From source: http://www.ccohs.ca/products/webinars/psych/

Our col­leagues Drs. Merv Gilbert and Dan Bilsker, are offer­ing a free webi­nar tar­get­ing employ­ers who are imple­ment­ing the rec­om­men­da­tions of the Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety Stan­dard released by the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada.

Accord­ing to the webi­nar description:

This pre­sen­ta­tion by the guide authors will include a brief descrip­tion of the under­ly­ing research and frame­work, an overview of the con­tents, and rec­om­men­da­tions for appli­ca­tion and dis­sem­i­na­tion. Orga­ni­za­tions that imple­ment some of the rec­om­mended actions will be encour­aged to share their expe­ri­ences in order to inspire and instruct others.

Note: The webi­nar was orig­i­nally pre­sented May 8, 2012, as part of North Amer­i­can Occu­pa­tional Safety and Health Week 2012.
 

————————————————————————————

How can we help?

About Home­wood

For more than 129 years, Home­wood has been a cor­ner­stone of Cana­dian addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment. We save lives. We have helped thou­sands of Cana­di­ans for decades to cope with the dev­as­tat­ing effects of men­tal ill­ness and addic­tion. Founded in 1883, we are renowned for the qual­ity of our treat­ment, our med­ical integrity, and the breadth and depth of our inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team.

Home­wood is part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion based in Kitch­ener, Ontario, that incor­po­rates three other entities:

Home­wood Human Solu­tions (www.homewoodhumansolutions.com)

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre (www.homewood.org)

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (www.homewood.org/disability-treatment-program)

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Schlegel Vil­lages (www.schlegelvillages.com)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Psychological Health and Safety: An Action Guide for Employers

From the source: http://www.sfu.ca/carmha/publications/psychological-health-safety-guide-for-employers.html

As the bur­den of work­place men­tal health prob­lems on the pub­lic and pri­vate sec­tors in Canada increases, the man­age­ment of work­place men­tal health issues will be of increas­ing impor­tance. Yet, strate­gies for the assess­ment, pre­ven­tion and treat­ment of men­tal health prob­lems in the work­place are under­de­vel­oped and underused.

In order to help rem­edy this the Work­force Advi­sory Com­mit­tee of the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada asked CARMHA to exam­ine the rel­e­vant sci­en­tific and ‘grey’ lit­er­a­ture on approaches to improv­ing the men­tal health of employ­ees and cre­ate prac­ti­cal resource for employ­ers. The aim of Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety: An Action Guide for Employ­ers, is to help employ­ers to cre­ate a psy­cho­log­i­cally healthy work­place, one that sup­ports the psy­cho­log­i­cal health of employ­ees in a man­ner that also fur­thers the goals of the orga­ni­za­tion. Pro­mot­ing psy­cho­log­i­cal health for the entire work­force is an excel­lent strat­egy for reduc­ing the risk of psy­cho­log­i­cal harm. A psy­cho­log­i­cally healthy work­place helps keep work­ers safe, engaged and productive.

The Guide is based on a com­pre­hen­sive imple­men­ta­tion model, the P6 Frame­work, that describes the change process in terms of six suc­ces­sive com­po­nents: Pol­icy, Plan­ning, Pro­mo­tion, Pre­ven­tion, Process and Persistence.

For each com­po­nent of the P6 Frame­work, three prac­ti­cal actions are pro­vided. These actions are con­sis­tent with research evi­dence and rep­re­sent a promis­ing prac­tice in the field of psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety. Each action also includes an expla­na­tion of why it mat­ters, how to imple­ment it and access to sup­port­ive tools that are web-based, pri­mar­ily Cana­dian and avail­able at no or min­i­mal cost.

The guide also includes sto­ries that illus­trate how work­places have tack­led psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety. The Guide is avail­able in French and Eng­lish and is con­sis­tent with, and com­ple­men­tary to, the National Stan­dard of Canada for Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety in the Workplace.

We highly rec­om­mend down­load­ing and review­ing this action guide. This is the only ded­i­cated guide of its kind relat­ing to the new Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety Stan­dard imple­men­ta­tion. And it is avail­able in both French and Eng­lish (see the source for links to down­load the Action Guide).

 

————————————————————————————

How can we help?

About Home­wood

For more than 129 years, Home­wood has been a cor­ner­stone of Cana­dian addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment. We save lives. We have helped thou­sands of Cana­di­ans for decades to cope with the dev­as­tat­ing effects of men­tal ill­ness and addic­tion. Founded in 1883, we are renowned for the qual­ity of our treat­ment, our med­ical integrity, and the breadth and depth of our inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team.

Home­wood is part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion based in Kitch­ener, Ontario, that incor­po­rates three other entities:

Home­wood Human Solu­tions (www.homewoodhumansolutions.com)

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre (www.homewood.org)

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (www.homewood.org/disability-treatment-program)

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Schlegel Vil­lages (www.schlegelvillages.com)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

APA Survey Finds US Employers Unresponsive to Employee Needs

A March 2013 report on a new sur­vey from the Amer­i­can Psy­cho­log­i­cal Association’s Cen­ter for Orga­ni­za­tional Excel­lence (http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/03/employee-needs.aspx) has some find­ings that our blog read­ers may find rel­e­vant and infor­ma­tive for their work­place employee sup­port prac­tices. Notably, the following.

  1. Less than half of work­ing Amer­i­cans reported that they receive ade­quate mon­e­tary com­pen­sa­tion or non-monetary recognition.
  2. Only 43 per­cent said that recog­ni­tion is based on fair per­for­mance evaluations.
  3. Less than half said their employ­ers ‘hear’ them by seek­ing input, and only 37% of employ­ees said employ­ers take action on this feedback.
  4. Less than half of employ­ees sur­veyed said that there were resources to sup­port their men­tal health needs (and fewer still, 36%, said that there were resources to sup­port man­ag­ing stress).

Says Nor­man B. Ander­son, PhD, CEO of the APA:

This isn’t just an HR or man­age­ment issue. The well-being of an organization’s work­force is a strate­gic busi­ness imper­a­tive that is linked to its per­for­mance and success.

For women, the office is not “a level play­ing field”

The sur­vey fur­ther inves­ti­gated how female employ­ees per­ceived the work envi­ron­ment. Sum­ma­riz­ing the results:

  1. Forty-eight per­cent of women felt less val­ued than men.
  2. Fewer employed women than men reported that their employer pro­vides suf­fi­cient oppor­tu­ni­ties for inter­nal career advance­ment (35 % ver­sus 43%) or resources to help them man­age stress (34% ver­sus 38%).
  3. More women than men said they “typ­i­cally feel tense or stressed out at work” (37% ver­sus 33%).

Work-Life Fit?

In terms of work-life bal­ance, the sur­vey results revealed:

  1. Only 52% of work­ers believe employ­ers value work-life balance.
  2. Only 39% of work­ers reported that their employ­ers pro­vide options for flex­i­ble work.
  3. Sur­pris­ingly per­haps? Thirty-seven per­cent of women reported reg­u­larly using employee ben­e­fits designed to help them meet work-life demands (whereas almost half of male work­ers reported tak­ing advan­tage of these ben­e­fits); and just 38% of women said they reg­u­larly uti­lize work arrange­ments, com­pared to 42% of men.

Con­clud­ing the report, David W. Bal­lard, PsyD, MBA head of APA’s Cen­ter for Orga­ni­za­tional Excel­lence, comments:

When employ­ers acknowl­edge that employ­ees have respon­si­bil­i­ties and lives out­side of work, they can take steps to pro­mote a good work-life fit and help indi­vid­u­als bet­ter man­age these mul­ti­ple demands…Forward-thinking orga­ni­za­tions are reeval­u­at­ing work prac­tices, pro­vid­ing employ­ees with resources that sup­port well-being and per­for­mance and apply­ing new tech­nolo­gies that help shift work from some­where we go from 9-to-5 to some­thing we do that is mean­ing­ful and cre­ates value.

 
————————————————————————————

How can we help?

About Home­wood

For more than 129 years, Home­wood has been a cor­ner­stone of Cana­dian addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment. We save lives. We have helped thou­sands of Cana­di­ans for decades to cope with the dev­as­tat­ing effects of men­tal ill­ness and addic­tion. Founded in 1883, we are renowned for the qual­ity of our treat­ment, our med­ical integrity, and the breadth and depth of our inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team.

Home­wood is part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion based in Kitch­ener, Ontario, that incor­po­rates three other entities:

Home­wood Human Solu­tions (www.homewoodhumansolutions.com)

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre (www.homewood.org)

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (www.homewood.org/disability-treatment-program)

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Schlegel Vil­lages (www.schlegelvillages.com)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Psychological Health and Safety podcast

Our col­league psy­chol­o­gist Merv Gilbert (Adjunct Pro­fes­sor at Simon Fraser Uni­ver­sity) and Gerry Culina, Gen­eral Health and Safety Ser­vices Man­ager at CCOHS, dis­cuss the pow­er­ful and expand­ing impact men­tal health prob­lems have on the workplace.

Released: Feb­ru­ary 13, 2013

CCOHS pro­duces FREE monthly pod­casts designed to keep you cur­rent with infor­ma­tion, tips and insights into the health, safety and well-being of work­ing Cana­di­ans.
http://www.ccohs.ca/products/podcasts/
————————————————————————————

How can we help?

About Home­wood

For more than 129 years, Home­wood has been a cor­ner­stone of Cana­dian addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment. We save lives. We have helped thou­sands of Cana­di­ans for decades to cope with the dev­as­tat­ing effects of men­tal ill­ness and addic­tion. Founded in 1883, we are renowned for the qual­ity of our treat­ment, our med­ical integrity, and the breadth and depth of our inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team.

Home­wood is part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion based in Kitch­ener, Ontario, that incor­po­rates three other entities:

Home­wood Human Solu­tions (www.homewoodhumansolutions.com)

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre (www.homewood.org)

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (www.homewood.org/disability-treatment-program)

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Schlegel Vil­lages (www.schlegelvillages.com)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.