Manulife / Ipsos Reid Health and Wealth Wellness Study 2014

The Man­ulife / Ipsos Reid Health and Wealth Well­ness Study 2014 is based on the results of an online sur­vey of over 2,000 work­ing Cana­di­ans from across Canada. The sur­vey was fielded in Feb­ru­ary 2014.

Take­away 1

There are strong links between how finan­cially pre­pared an employee feels, and how healthy, engaged and pro­duc­tive they are in the workplace.

Take­away 2

There is a pos­i­tive link between health and finan­cial well­be­ing. Employ­ees that are finan­cially pre­pared are more likely to be health­ier than those feel­ing unprepared.

Take­away 3

There is a very strong link between hav­ing a ben­e­fits and sav­ings plan and being finan­cially pre­pared. In fact, indi­vid­u­als with both a work­place ben­e­fits and retire­ment sav­ings plan are over 50% more likely to be finan­cially pre­pared than those with­out plans.

Take­away 4

Finan­cial advi­sors improve chances to be finan­cially prepared.

Source: Read the Man­ulife report here.


About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

BC teens smoking and drinking less, but mental health issues climb: survey

Van­cou­ver Sun : Feb­ru­ary 12, 2014

Quot­ing from the article:

While binge drink­ing and sub­stance use is declin­ing among B.C. youth, an increas­ing num­ber of teenage girls are report­ing prob­lems with men­tal health issues, accord­ing to a new sur­vey. Sui­ci­dal thoughts rose among girls to 17 per cent in 2013, from 14 per cent in 2008, accord­ing to the B.C. Ado­les­cents Health Sur­vey, released Wednes­day from the McCreary Cen­tre Soci­ety. A total of 30,000 Grade 7 to 12 stu­dents were sur­veyed in 56 of the province’s 59 school dis­tricts in 2013.

Of the males sur­veyed, eight per cent reported sui­ci­dal inten­tion, down from nine per cent in 2008.

Females were three times as likely as males to report a men­tal or emo­tional health con­di­tion (15 per cent com­pared to five per cent), the sur­vey found. They were also more likely than boys to report hav­ing panic attacks, extreme dis­tress and despair. Also trou­bling is that many of those teens are not seek­ing med­ical help.

For both males and females, the most com­mon rea­son for not access­ing med­ical help was think­ing or hop­ing the prob­lem would go away. The next most com­mon rea­son for males was being too busy to go, whereas for females it was not want­ing their par­ents to know. Eleven per cent of stu­dents reported need­ing help for men­tal health issues but felt they didn’t have access to that help.

The num­ber of youth who did not seek help because they did not want their par­ents to know jumped 18 per­cent­age points to 37 per cent in 2013, from 19 per cent in 2008.

Researchers say the results show work needs to be done to break down the stigma around men­tal health issues.

 

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

A Brief History of the DSM

A Brief His­tory of the DSM

The first DSM appeared in 1952 and, since then, has gar­nered both acco­lades and crit­i­cisms. Once intended for today, guide­lines for diag­noses are quite elab­o­rate and, con­se­quently, con­tro­ver­sial. In par­tic­u­lar are con­cerns about the increase in sta­tis­tics for men­tal ill­nesses as a result of reclas­si­fy­ing what was once con­sid­ered part of every­day liv­ing (“nor­mal”) could poten­tially be reclas­si­fied pathological.

The DSM is a rel­a­tively young clas­si­fi­ca­tion sys­tem of men­tal dis­or­ders, fill­ing a need that has a long his­tory in med­i­cine and psy­chi­a­try. After two mil­len­nia of evo­lu­tion, with vary­ing emphases on patho­log­i­cal the­o­ries, eti­ol­ogy, and defin­ing fea­tures, and, most notably the prin­ci­ple objec­tives for its use (clin­i­cal? research? statistics?).

In North Amer­ica, the ini­tial stim­u­lus for a men­tal dis­or­ders clas­si­fi­ca­tion sys­tem was to sat­isfy a need for sta­tis­tics. In the mid 1800s world gov­ern­ments were rec­og­niz­ing the need to take respon­si­bil­ity for indi­vid­u­als with a men­tal ill­ness and the vol­umes of the cost of new care facil­i­ties was daunt­ing. Con­se­quently, the first 1840 the first vari­ant of a today’s clas­si­fi­ca­tion of men­tal dis­or­ders was cre­ated. And a small man­ual it was—having one cat­e­gory. Quite sim­ply “idocy/insanity.” By 1880, seven cat­e­gories were dis­tin­guished: mania, melan­cho­lia, mono­ma­nia, pare­sis, demen­tia, dip­so­ma­nia, and epilepsy. Apart from the need for cen­sus sta­tis­tics, the man­ual was used to deter­mine who could func­tion in soci­ety and who would need new, as yet not cre­ated, men­tal ill­ness services.

In 1917, the Amer­i­can Medico-Psychological Asso­ci­a­tion, fore­run­ner of the Amer­i­can Psy­cho­log­i­cal Asso­ci­a­tion, and the National Com­mis­sion on Men­tal Hygiene called for a more detailed diag­nos­tic sys­tem, still util­i­tar­ian in that it would gather uni­form sta­tis­tics across men­tal hos­pi­tals. It was still pri­mar­ily util­i­tar­ian with 22 diag­noses (the Sta­tis­ti­cal Man­ual for the Use of Insti­tu­tions for the Insane).

WWII

Chief con­cern in North Amer­ica soon became how to treat the large num­ber of return­ing sol­diers suf­fer­ing shell shock. The prac­ti­cal con­sid­er­a­tion now became para­mount, con­sid­er­ing the depen­dence of the armies upon med­ical assess­ment and fit­ness for duty deter­mi­na­tion. Con­se­quently, a new diag­nos­tic sys­tem and an expanded nomen­cla­ture (devel­oped by the US Army) was pub­lished (1943) and adopted by the US armed forces. The Vet­er­ans Asso­ci­a­tion par­tic­i­pated in the devel­op­ment of the expanded nomen­cla­ture and adopted by the Asso­ci­a­tion to bet­ter incor­po­rate the out­pa­tient pre­sen­ta­tions of WWII vets.

The next leap of devel­op­ment was urged by changes to the Inter­na­tional Clas­si­fi­ca­tion of Dis­eases which had, until 1948, focused exclu­sively on phys­i­cal ill­ness. Fol­low­ing the addi­tion of a sec­tion on men­tal dis­or­ders the APA pro­duced an adapted ver­sion of “Med­ical 203”, a pre­cur­sor to the DSM and con­sid­ered the orig­i­nal DSM. And this DSM was the first to include clin­i­cal util­ity among its objec­tives. How­ever, the man­ual reflected psy­chi­atric thought at the time, largely Freudian (which attrib­utes men­tal dis­or­ders to an individual’s child­hood expe­ri­ences and unre­solved issues from the past).

DSM-I listed 95 men­tal dis­or­ders. Two years later, that num­ber great to 130 (DSM-II).

The sub­jec­tiv­ity of diag­no­sis of both early ver­sions of the DSM were quickly crit­i­cized and responded to with a wealth of research demon­strat­ing wide vari­a­tion in diag­nos­tic rates of schiz­o­phre­nia in dif­fer­ent countries—the US hav­ing the high­est reported preva­lence. Most notably, psy­cho­log­i­cal David Rosen­han stud­ied the diag­nos­tic out­comes of eight healthy, oth­er­wise ‘nor­mal’ indi­vid­u­als sent to gain admis­sion to 12 dif­fer­ent psy­chi­atric hos­pi­tals, say­ing they ‘heard voices.’ Once admit­ted, they were to exhibit no symp­toms and act nat­u­rally and nor­mally. No hos­pi­tal detected that these were fake attempts at men­tal dis­or­der and all were diag­nosed with a men­tal ill­ness and pre­scribed med­ica­tion accord­ingly. That med­ica­tion, in turn, wildly var­ied across hos­pi­tal despite the same ini­tial symp­tom pre­sen­ta­tion across ‘patients.’

Post war

The DSM-III aimed to improve the uni­for­mity and valid­ity of psy­chi­atric diag­no­sis and pre­vent over­diag­no­sis. New the­o­ries of men­tal pathol­ogy were adopted, Freud was aban­doned, and symp­toms were diag­nosed based on pre­sen­ta­tion of symp­toms alone, all of which were more clearly defined. New objec­tives were also satisfied…those focus­ing on explicit diag­nos­tic cri­te­ria, a mul­ti­ax­ial sys­tem, and a descrip­tive approach that was neu­tral to the­o­ries of etiology.

Now reach­ing 188 diag­nos­tic cat­e­gories, and being as large as a typ­i­cal phone book, the DSM was stretch­ing itself fur­ther. A between-version revi­sion, DSM-IIIR, add yet another 27 cat­e­gories, bring­ing that total to 215. And more pages, of course.

New prob­lems. The chair of the DSM com­mit­tee, him­self, crit­i­cized the man­ual cit­ing med­ical­iza­tion of 20 to 30 per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion as chief among the problems.

The APA decided it was time for an even larger edi­tion and in 1994 pub­lished the 283-diagnosis 886 page tome, DSM-IV. The most notable evo­lu­tion was the require­ment in diag­no­sis of deter­min­ing “clin­i­cal sig­nif­i­cant dis­tress or impair­ment in social, occu­pa­tional, or other impor­tant areas of func­tion­ing.” Hmm. More sub­jec­tiv­ity and con­fu­sion because each indi­vid­ual will express dif­fer­ing expres­sions of what is ‘dis­tress­ing’ to them. And con­text is also largely a deter­mi­nant of func­tion­al­ity and dis­tress.
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How can we help?

About Home­wood

For more than 129 years, Home­wood has been a cor­ner­stone of Cana­dian addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment. We save lives. We have helped thou­sands of Cana­di­ans for decades to cope with the dev­as­tat­ing effects of men­tal ill­ness and addic­tion. Founded in 1883, we are renowned for the qual­ity of our treat­ment, our med­ical integrity, and the breadth and depth of our inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team.

Home­wood is part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion based in Kitch­ener, Ontario, that incor­po­rates three other entities:

Home­wood Human Solu­tions (www.homewoodhumansolutions.com)

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre (www.homewood.org)

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (www.homewood.org/disability-treatment-program)

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Schlegel Vil­lages (www.schlegelvillages.com)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!


Com­ments? Thoughts or resources to share?

.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Employers challenged to ‘fix’ workplace mental health issues

In a sur­vey released Tues­day, polling com­pany Ipsos-Reid found that 22 per cent of Cana­dian work­ers are expe­ri­enc­ing depres­sion, which is a sim­i­lar per­cent­age to what ear­lier stud­ies have found in the pop­u­la­tion at large.

The sur­vey, which was com­mis­sioned by the Great-West Life Cen­tre for Men­tal Health in the Work­place, revealed that 84 per cent of employ­ers and man­agers say they believe it is part of their job to inter­vene when they feel an employee is exhibit­ing signs of depres­sion. But 63 per cent also said they would like to have more train­ing to deal with employ­ees who have depression.

Sum­ma­riz­ing the Globe and Mail report “Employ­ers alone can’t fix work­place depres­sion” (Andre Mayer, Oct 11, 2012):

1. While there is no clin­i­cal diag­no­sis of ‘work­place depres­son’, the stresses of the office can man­i­fest in tra­di­tional clin­i­cal depres­sive expression.

2. An April 2012 report by the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada said that men­tal health prob­lems account for about 30 per cent of short‐ and long‐term dis­abil­ity claims. The same report claimed that in 2010, men­tal health con­di­tions accounted for 47 per cent of all approved dis­abil­ity claims in the Cana­dian civil ser­vice — nearly dou­ble the per­cent­age of 20 years ear­lier. (note, the rise in claims doesn’t mean that the mod­ern work­force is more toxic, some of the stigma has decreased, so peo­ple are more will­ing to talk about it).

3. It is esti­mated that between com­pen­sa­tion to sick work­ers and lost pro­duc­tiv­ity, men­tal health issues cost the Cana­dian econ­omy $50 bil­lion a year.

4. Deal­ing with the issues, some Cana­dian com­pa­nies are man­ag­ing both phys­i­cal and men­tal health issues among their employ­ees. The strate­gies include train­ing man­agers to iden­tify and reach out to depres­sive work­ers, and offer­ing finan­cial incen­tives for employ­ees to improve their phys­i­cal and men­tal well-being, which can include gym passes or a nom­i­nal pay­ment to undergo a well­ness assessment.

Take home mes­sage? Per­haps the most ben­e­fi­cial thing an employer can do is direct a psy­cho­log­i­cally ill worker to treat­ment, says Dr. Car­olyn Dewa, head of the Work and Well-Being Research and Eval­u­a­tion Pro­gram at the Cen­tre for Addic­tion and Men­tal Health.

 

 

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Are we all that anxious? More problems with the DSM

The debate about pro­posed changes for the DSM-5 con­tin­ues to boil.

Con­tin­u­ing the debate we’ve reported on in pre­vi­ous posts on this blog (Debat­ing the DSM-5 and DSM-5: Cause for seri­ous con­cern?), Sharon Bagely’s recent arti­cle “In the age of anx­i­ety, are we all men­tally ill?” presents three argu­ments. Quot­ing from the article:

The crit­i­cism rests on three argu­ments. First, the DSM fails to rec­og­nize that anx­i­ety is nor­mal and even ben­e­fi­cial in many sit­u­a­tions, so it con­flates a prop­erly func­tion­ing brain sys­tem with a pathol­ogy. Sec­ond, the DSM’s descrip­tion of anx­i­ety is more about enforc­ing social norms than medicine.

Finally, they say, anx­i­ety is adap­tive. Its brain cir­cuitry was honed by evo­lu­tion for a pur­pose. Only when that mech­a­nism mis­fires should a per­son be diag­nosed as men­tally ill.

No human emo­tion is more basic than anx­i­ety,” said soci­ol­o­gist Allan Hor­witz of Rut­gers Uni­ver­sity. “Many forms of it sim­ply should not be cat­e­go­rized as dis­or­ders, because they’re the result of the way peo­ple evolved thou­sands of years ago, rather than some­thing going wrong.”

Coun­ter­ing these argu­ments, Dr. Car­olyn Robi­nowitz, a past pres­i­dent of the Amer­i­can Psy­chi­atric Asso­ca­tion who is in pri­vate prac­tice in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., com­ments “Peo­ple who crit­i­cize that are show­ing their bias…When we get bet­ter at diag­nos­ing hyper­ten­sion, we don’t say that’s terrible.”

No doubt this debate will con­tinue and hope­fully a bal­ance of evi­dence, best prac­tices, and clin­i­cal judge­ment will pre­vail over spe­cial inter­est group, polit­i­cal, social pol­icy, and/or com­mer­cial interests.

In the mean­time, we’ll do our best to stay calm.
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Databases for alcohol research

The National Insti­tute on Alco­hol Abuse and Alco­holism (NIAAA) has cre­ated a por­tal to sup­port researchers and prac­ti­tion­ers search­ing for infor­ma­tion related to alco­hol research. This page includes links to a num­ber of data­bases, jour­nals, and Web sites focused on alco­hol research and related top­ics. Also included is a link to the archived ETOH data­base, the pre­mier Alco­hol and Alco­hol Prob­lems Sci­ence Data­base, pro­duced by NIAAA from 1972 through Decem­ber 2003.

Both Cana­dian and Amer­i­can resources are listed.

Entry to the Alco­hol and Alco­hol Prob­lems main web­site. Click here.

Direct access to the resources list­ings. Click here.
Visit our home­page: Home­wood Human Solutions™

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Released! Psychological Health and Safety Guide for Employers

As noted in an ear­lier post, we have been fol­low­ing progress on pro­duc­tion of the Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety Guide for Employers.

The full and com­plete action report is now released and avail­able from our media library (down­load here), from the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion web­site as a PDF, or as an inter­ac­tive ver­sion.

To sum­ma­rize key points:

  • The Action Guide is based on the idea of pro­tect­ing employ­ees’ psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety.
  • There will soon be a stan­dard for psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety in the work­place, the National Stan­dard of Canada for Psy­cho­log­i­cal Health and Safety in the Work­place, sched­uled for release in late 2012.
  • A frame­work for psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety action plan­ning and exe­cu­tion is being devel­oped con­sis­tent with ISO stan­dard for orga­ni­za­tional qual­ity (described below).

Under­stand­ing the P6 Frame­work is key to progress in the area of psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety. There are six components:

  • Pol­icy: A clear state­ment of the organization’s commitment.
  • Plan­ning: Lay­ing out a log­i­cal model for change, objec­tives, processes, measurables.
  • Pro­mo­tion: Actions taken to pro­mote the gen­eral psy­cho­log­i­cal health of the workforce.
  • Pre­ven­tion: empha­sizes the need to ensure that staff under­stand the com­mit­ment to psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety.
  • Process: empha­sizes the need to audit the ade­quacy of poli­cies and eval­u­ate the out­comes of actions.
  • Per­sis­tence: empha­sizes the role of man­age­ment and orga­ni­za­tional lead­er­ship in seek­ing con­tin­ued improvement.

In addi­tion to out­lin­ing the frame­work and pro­vid­ing sev­eral key resources for each com­po­nent of the P6 frame­work, the action guide:

  • Demon­strate that psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety is a crit­i­cal con­cern for all Cana­dian employers.
  • Iden­ti­fies some effec­tive and fea­si­ble actions.
  • Pro­vides a tool to sup­port you in address­ing psy­cho­log­i­cal health and safety.

The report was authored by our psy­chol­o­gist col­leagues, and long-term men­tors of this blog post author: Drs. Merv Gilbert and Dan Bilsker from the Cen­tre for Applied Research in Men­tal Health and Addic­tion, Simon Fraser Uni­ver­sity (www.carmha.ca)

 

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Business Case Bibliography

Dr. Mark Attridge, one of the authors of our Annual Reports, has released a review paper on the topic of mak­ing the busi­ness case for pro­vid­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to employ­ees and fam­ily members.

The list empha­sizes EAP ser­vices and most works exam­ine finan­cial issues of:

  • cost-benefit
  • cost-effectiveness
  • return-on-investment

The reports are pre­sented in five sec­tions by type of author source:

  • Brief reports in indus­try publications
  • Employer guides
  • Review papers in sci­en­tific journals
  • White papers and gov­ern­ment reports
  • Books

Down­load the bib­li­og­ra­phy here. EASNA Research Notes Vol­ume 2, Num­ber 4, Decem­ber 2011.

 

Visit our home­page: Home­wood Human Solutions™

Like us on facebook.com/homewoodhumansolutions

Fol­low @HomewoodHS on Twitter

Link with linkedin.com/companies/homewood-human-solutions

Watch us on our Home­woodHS YouTube channel