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Rising toll of mental illness worries students

The Guelph mer­cury reported today:

Stu­dent clin­ics report more demand for psy­cho­log­i­cal ser­vices from every­one on cam­pus — under­grads, post­grads, researchers, teach­ing assis­tants, fac­ulty and admin­is­tra­tive staff. As well, the Cana­dian Men­tal Health Asso­ci­a­tion and the Cen­tre for Addic­tion and Men­tal Health are all dis­sem­i­nat­ing the same esti­mate they’ve always used: 10 to 20 per cent of Cana­dian youth are affected by men­tal ill­ness. Sta­tis­tics Canada shows ele­vated rates of depres­sion and sub­stance abuse in the 15 to 24 age bracket.

The Cana­dian Alliance of Stu­dent Asso­ci­a­tions is so con­cerned of the toll of men­tal ill­ness (and its’ ris­ing) that it has just released a pol­icy paper call­ing for a national plan to address ado­les­cent men­tal ill­ness. The alliance, made up of 22 stu­dent asso­ci­a­tions rep­re­sent­ing 280,000 young peo­ple, is urg­ing fed­eral par­ties to incor­po­rate its pro­pos­als into their 2015 elec­tion platforms.

Stu­dent lead­ers are ask­ing for four spe­cific commitments:

  • They want Canada’s next gov­ern­ment to pro­vide more finan­cial sup­port for vul­ner­a­ble stu­dents, includ­ing more grants and low-interest loans. They are also ask­ing that grad­u­ates deal­ing with men­tal health prob­lems be allowed extra time, at no penalty, to pay their loans.
  • They want improved men­tal health treat­ment on cam­puses. Too often post-secondary stu­dents are referred to psy­chol­o­gists or psy­chi­a­trists with long wait­ing lists or sent to com­mu­nity treat­ment facil­i­ties already at capacity.
  • They want reli­able men­tal health infor­ma­tion so they don’t have to use anec­dotes and per­cep­tions to con­vince policy-makers that vul­ner­a­ble stu­dents need help.
  • And they want an addi­tional $4.5 mil­lion a year ear­marked for the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada to ramp up its anti-stigma cam­paign in schools, col­leges and universities.

Source: Guelph Mer­cury


 

About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

Latest News Jul 9: Mental health stigma, addictions, behaviour change

Many obese women face stigma every day, study finds.

U.S. News & World Report­Sea­cat, who pre­vi­ously focused on the stigma asso­ci­ated with HIV and AIDS, first became inter­ested in study­ing stigma­ti­za­tion and obe­sity while he ..

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2014/07/07/many-obese-women-face-stigma-every-day-study-finds

Ther­apy los­ing stigma as coun­selling fig­ures rise.

More than a quar­ter of peo­ple have had coun­selling, accord­ing to a poll which sug­gests a nation increas­ingly will­ing to seek help. A third of women …

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/health/mental-health/article4141348.ece?CMP=OTH-gnws-standard-2014_07_07

Brains, genes, and chem­i­cal imbal­ances — how expla­na­tions of men­tal ilness affect stigma.

One pos­si­ble side effect of these devel­op­ments is a reduc­tion in stigma. If the cause of psy­chi­atric mis­ery is in our brain chem­istry or our DNA, then the ..

http://theconversation.com/brains-genes-and-chemical-imbalances-how-explanations-of-mental-illness-affect-stigma-28324

Block­ing mem­o­ries could help treat drug addiction.

In sub­stance addic­tion, drug-associated mem­o­ries are known to pow­er­fully com­pel crav­ing and drug seek­ing behav­iour. Research by Pro­fes­sor Barry …

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/blocking-memories-could-help-treat-drug-addiction-2014–07-08

“Peo­ple first” approach impor­tant for addic­tion treatment.

The choice of words when dis­cussing those afflicted with the dis­ease of addic­tion cre­ates a dis­tinc­tion that can make a dif­fer­ence, recov­ery experts …

http://www.post-gazette.com/news/health/2014/07/08/Pople-first-approach-important-for-addiction-treatment/stories/201407020184

Five seri­ously bad side effects of your smart­phone addiction.

https://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/5-seriously-bad-side-effects-smartphone-addiction-152200598.html

Behav­ior Expert Calls on Well­ness Pro­grams to Heed Johns Hop­kins Study Findings

Behav­ior change expert, Lou Ryan, has called on the well­ness indus­try to learn from a new Johns Hop­kins tobacco ces­sa­tion study that included a …

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2038528


About Home­wood Health

Home­wood Health is the Cana­dian leader in men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices. With over 130 years of expe­ri­ence, we achieve out­stand­ing out­comes every day through our national net­work of nearly 4,000 employ­ees and clin­i­cal experts, and through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre — one of Canada’s largest and lead­ing facil­i­ties for med­ical treat­ment of men­tal health and addic­tion dis­or­ders. Our com­plete suite of ser­vices includes orga­ni­za­tional well­ness, employee and fam­ily assis­tance pro­grams, assess­ments, out­pa­tient and inpa­tient treat­ment, recov­ery man­age­ment, return to work and fam­ily sup­port ser­vices, cus­tomized to meet the spe­cial­ized needs of indi­vid­u­als and orga­ni­za­tions. Home­wood Health is redefin­ing men­tal health and addic­tion ser­vices to help Cana­di­ans live health­ier, more pro­duc­tive and more ful­fill­ing lives.

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Health, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Canadians really love their beer!

Cana­di­ans really love their beer!

From the arti­cle: Cana­di­ans are drink­ing a lot com­pared to most of the world.

The World Health Orga­ni­za­tion released a report on global alco­hol con­sump­tion Mon­day and it con­tains a clear mes­sage about Cana­di­ans: we love beer.

Con­sump­tion of alco­hol is up slightly, with Cana­di­ans over the age of 15 con­sum­ing an aver­age of 10.2 litres of pure alco­hol per year in 2008–2010 vs. 9.8 litres in 2003–2005. The increase comes after a long period of decline in con­sump­tion, which peaked in the early 1980s.

Down­load the full report of WHO here.

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

The Problem With Painkillers: Managing Opioid Use in Canada

From Reader’s Digest March 2014

Quot­ing the article:

To many patients, pre­scrip­tion pills rep­re­sent a respite from chronic pain and suf­fer­ing, but to the approx­i­mately 200,000 Cana­di­ans hooked on painkillers, the med­i­cine cab­i­net has led to what doc­tors are call­ing a national pre­scrip­tion drug crisis.

Last year, the Cana­dian Cen­tre on Sub­stance Abuse (CCSA) intro­duced a strat­egy to com­bat the prob­lem. Fac­ing par­tic­u­lar scrutiny are opi­oids, the clas­si­fi­ca­tion of nar­cotics made from opium and that include house­hold names Oxy­con­tin, codeine, Vicodin and Demerol. Far from harm­less, they are sim­i­lar in chem­i­cal makeup, addic­tive qual­ity and impact on the body to heroin and can have long-term phys­i­cal effects that range from seda­tion to hor­mone interference.

The government’s new strat­egy is recon­tex­tu­al­iz­ing what drug addic­tion rep­re­sents in Canada—it’s a health issue.” That shift hope­fully means a more open con­ver­sa­tion about treat­ment options and con­trol for a prob­lem that has, up until the past few years, gone largely unacknowledged.

Warn­ing signs of pre­scrip­tion drug abuse:

        Phys­i­cal: blood­shot eyes, dilated pupils, sud­den weight loss or gain, slurred speech, tremors or impairment.

        Behav­ioural: shirk­ing respon­si­bil­i­ties, using more of a drug than pre­scribed, and pur­pose­fully going to mul­ti­ple phar­ma­cies and doctors.

        Psy­cho­log­i­cal: sud­den mood swings, changes in atti­tude, angry out­bursts, anx­ious or para­noid behaviour.

How to han­dle a pos­si­ble pre­scrip­tion pill addic­tion in your family:

First, talk to the per­son and express con­cern. Often, if a loved one is addicted, they won’t want to engage, says David Juurlink, drug safety researcher and asso­ciate pro­fes­sor at the Uni­ver­sity of Toronto. If they demur, talk to their doc­tor. “More often than not, I sus­pect the doc­tor doesn’t real­ize there’s a prob­lem,” he says. Although patient-physician con­fi­den­tial­ity means a doc­tor can’t divulge infor­ma­tion, they’re enti­tled to receive details about a patient.

How to dis­cuss dosages with your doctor:

Addic­tion implies a pat­tern of use despite harm to one­self. So while you may not be addicted, you can still have con­cerns about the doses of your drugs. Ask your prac­ti­tioner if it’s con­ceiv­able to dial a dosage down grad­u­ally. Accord­ing to Juurlink, high lev­els of some pre­scrip­tion painkillers have been shown to worsen pain. If you’re con­cerned for your safety, inquire.

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

In the news: Trends in Mental Health and Addictions

MENTAL HEALTH

Skep­ti­cism greets resump­tion of talks to reduce sui­cide toll Canada.com. Decem­ber 23, 2013

Pref­er­ences for Men­tal Health Treat­ment Options among Alaska Native Col­lege Stu­dents Amer­i­can Indian and Alaska Native Men­tal Health Research, 2013

Pedophilia Is A Sex­ual Ori­en­ta­tion, Cana­dian Experts Say  Oppos­ing View. Decem­ber 24, 2013

Mar­t­inuk: Sui­cide pre­ven­tion plans at odds with right to die Cal­gary Her­ald. Jan­u­ary 3, 2014

ADDICTION

Sur­vey shows increased drug use by P.E.I. stu­dents The Guardian — Decem­ber 19, 2013

B.C. strug­gles with how to treat the most severe of men­tally ill drug addicts Bran­don Sun. Decem­ber 27, 2013

No more hang­overs? New ‘alco­hol sur­ro­gate’ comes with anti­dote that can make you sober again in min­utes National Post — Decem­ber 30, 2013

Alco­hol abuse pro­grams in B.C., Ams­ter­dam use mod­er­a­tion  Man­aged alco­hol pro­grams give beer, wine, spir­its as part of treat­ment
CBC News — Jan­u­ary 6, 2014

Doc­tors should screen all adult patients for binge drink­ing: CDC report CTV News — Jan­u­ary 7, 2014

Drug and alco­hol abuse high among Yukon min­ers Alaska Dis­patch — Jan­u­ary 7, 2014

Canada’s pre­scrip­tion opi­oid cri­sis
Healthy Debate — Jan­u­ary 9, 2014

Dan­ger­ous new methadone 24 Hours Van­cou­ver — Jan­u­ary 11, 2014

Abbots­ford to review ban on harm-reduction ser­vices Globe and Mail — Jan­u­ary 13, 2014

Prince Edward Island men­tal health ser­vices stretched The Guardian Char­lot­te­town ? Jan­u­ary 7, 2014

WORKPLACE

Work­place well­ness pro­grams can cut chronic ill­ness costs

Man­ag­ing employ­ees with men­tal health issues: Iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of con­cep­tual and pro­ce­dural knowl­edge for devel­op­ment within man­age­ment edu­ca­tion cur­ric­ula. A Mar­tin, M Woods, S Dawkins — Acad­emy of Man­age­ment Learn­ing & Edu­ca­tion, 2014

RESEARCH / HEALTH

‘Rage dis­or­der’ may be treat­able with Aspirin, study sug­gests Canada.com  Decem­ber 30, 2013

Cana­dian Net­work to Pro­duce a Top 10 List of New and Emerg­ing Health Tech­nolo­gies in Canada CNW Jan­u­ary 8, 2014

Ket­a­mine acts as anti­de­pres­sant by boost­ing sero­tonin EurekAlert! — Jan­u­ary 7, 2014

One Ques­tion May Gauge Sever­ity of Unhealthy Drug, Alco­hol Use Sci­ence Daily — Jan­u­ary 13, 2013

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Canada’s doctors not trained in addictions medicine?

Orig­i­nal source: News 1130 Octo­ber 22, 2013.

From the article:

A new study out of UBC sug­gests doc­tors in the province, and the rest of Canada aren’t trained to deal with ill­nesses caused by drug and alco­hol addiction.

Peo­ple who are tak­ing care of patients with addic­tion, in almost all cases in British Colum­bia, haven’t gone through a stan­dard­ized train­ing pro­gram and that’s unique in our health­care system.”

New pos­si­bil­i­ties for training:

…A  five-year pro­gram with St. Paul’s will see more than 20 doc­tors from the province get the spe­cial­ized training.

It’s going to help bring new research and new med­ica­tions like this to British Colum­bia and help advance the sys­tem of care for patients with addictions.”

The St. Paul’s Hos­pi­tal Gold­corp Fel­low­ship in Addic­tion Med­i­cine will pro­vide fel­low­ships over the next five years and will begin in July.

 


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Study: One in three teens with bipolar disorder develop substance abuse

A study pub­lished in the Octo­ber 2013 issue of the Jour­nal of the Amer­i­can Acad­emy of Child and Ado­les­cent Psy­chi­a­try found that approx­i­mately one in three teens with bipo­lar dis­or­der devel­oped sub­stance abuse, for the first time, dur­ing 4 years of follow-up. The study also iden­ti­fied sev­eral risk fac­tors that pre­dicted who among these teens was most likely to develop sub­stance abuse. This unique lon­gi­tu­di­nal study, funded by the National Insti­tute of Men­tal Health, is the largest lon­gi­tu­di­nal study of chil­dren and ado­les­cents with bipo­lar dis­or­der. The 3-site study enrolled its par­tic­i­pants at UCLA, Uni­ver­sity of Pitts­burgh, and Brown Uni­ver­sity. Before the Course and Out­come of Bipo­lar Youth (COBY) study, there had been few stud­ies on the symp­tom pat­terns and course of the dis­or­der in the pedi­atric pop­u­la­tion. Under­stand­ing the effects of bipo­lar dis­or­der early in life may lead to bet­ter treat­ments and improve long-term out­comes as these chil­dren and ado­les­cents become adults.

Results from this study, and an ear­lier study from COBY, conclude:

  • bipo­lar dis­or­der appears to affect chil­dren and ado­les­cents more severely than adults. Study par­tic­i­pants had com­par­a­tively longer symp­to­matic stages and more fre­quent cycling (chang­ing from one mood to another) or mixed episodes.
  • chil­dren and ado­les­cents also con­verted from a less severe form of bipo­lar dis­or­der to a more severe form at a much higher rate than seen in adults.
  • 32% of ado­les­cents in COBY devel­oped abuse or depen­dence of alco­hol or drugs, on aver­age 2.7 years from the start of the study. Repeated exper­i­men­ta­tion with alco­hol at the start of the study was the sin­gle strongest pre­dic­tor of later sub­stance abuse, although exper­i­men­ta­tion with cannabis also pre­dicted later sub­stance abuse.
  • younger age of onset, low socio-economic sta­tus, and psy­chotic symp­toms were com­mon fac­tors in study par­tic­i­pants who had worse out­comes. In com­par­i­son with stud­ies of bipo­lar dis­or­der in adults, the researchers found major dif­fer­ences in the course of ill­ness in chil­dren, which may have a seri­ous impact on their emo­tional, cog­ni­tive, and social development.
  • five other fac­tors present at the start of the study also pre­dicted later sub­stance abuse: oppo­si­tional defi­ant dis­or­der, panic dis­or­der, fam­ily his­tory of sub­stance abuse, low fam­ily cohe­sive­ness, and absence of anti­de­pres­sant treat­ment. Among teens with 3 or more risk fac­tors, 54.7% went on to develop sub­stance abuse, com­pared to 14.1% of teens with 0–2 risk factors.

As noted by one study author, Dr. Ben­jamin Gold­estein, the risks asso­ci­ated with exper­i­men­tal sub­stance use among ado­les­cents are par­tic­u­larly high:

In the case of ado­les­cents with bipo­lar dis­or­der, even so-called recre­ational sub­stance use is play­ing with fire…We appear to have this win­dow of 2–3 years dur­ing which we can attempt to pre­vent sub­stance abuse in these youth. This study pro­vides some clues regard­ing the types of pre­ven­tive strate­gies that may be useful.”

Source: http://www.elsevier.com/

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How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

New Study Suggests That You Can Never Really Completely Leave Addiction Behind

New Study Sug­gests That You Can Never Really Com­pletely Leave Addic­tion Behind

Med­ical News Today — Sep­tem­ber 25, 2013

It is often said that once peo­ple develop an addic­tion, they can never com­pletely elim­i­nate their attrac­tion to the abused sub­stance. New find­ings pro­vide fur­ther sup­port for this notion by sug­gest­ing that even long-term absti­nence from cocaine does not result in a com­plete nor­mal­iza­tion of brain circuitry.

Sci­en­tists are cur­rently try­ing to answer some of the ‘chicken and egg’ ques­tions sur­round­ing the abuse of drugs. In par­tic­u­lar, one of those ques­tions is whether indi­vid­u­als who abuse psy­chos­tim­u­lants like cocaine are more impul­sive and show alter­ations in brain reward cir­cuits as a con­se­quence of using the drug, or whether such abnor­mal­i­ties existed prior to their drug use. In the for­mer case, one might expect brain alter­ations to nor­mal­ize fol­low­ing pro­longed drug abstinence.

Read more here.

Employers not doing enough for employees with addictions

From CBC News:

Employ­ers who attended a sym­po­sium held in Monc­ton on Thurs­day learned more about how to sup­port employ­ees who are strug­gling with addictions.

Dr. Patrick Smith, the CEO of a res­i­den­tial addic­tions treat­ment cen­tre in Toronto, said not enough com­pa­nies have a pol­icy in place for work­ers with an addic­tion to drugs or alcohol.

It’s no sur­prise that it shows up in work­places, espe­cially because 70 per cent of peo­ple with sub­stance use dis­or­ders are employed…Workplaces do have a respon­si­bil­ity to pro­vide the appro­pri­ate treat­ment and health response…

Smith said com­pa­nies have to rec­og­nize that addic­tion is a men­tal health issue and employ­ers should be deal­ing with it the same way they would any other health problem.

Tra­di­tion­ally one response has been, ‘This per­son has a drug or alco­hol prob­lem, let’s fire them.’ Imag­ine if some­one said to you that they were fired because they missed three days of work because of can­cer treat­ment or because of the can­cer symptoms.

Orga­niz­ers of the sym­po­sium said one in 12 work­ers have a seri­ous drug or alco­hol problem.

——————————————————————————–

How can we help?

The Healthy Work­places blog is brought to you by Home­wood Human Solu­tions. We are part of Schlegel Health Care, a family-owned health care orga­ni­za­tion with a focus on men­tal health and addic­tions, employee and fam­ily assis­tance, dis­abil­ity man­age­ment, and long-term care for older adults. How can we help?

Home­wood Human Solutions

Nation­wide EFAP and Dis­abil­ity Pro­grams

Home­wood Human Solu­tions™ offers a one-of-a-kind approach to the mar­ket: the high­est qual­ity of clin­i­cal sup­port and inter­ven­tion avail­able within the EFAP indus­try, and an unmatched con­tin­uum of ser­vices — span­ning health pro­mo­tion, men­tal health and addic­tions treat­ment, and prevention-focused work-life coun­selling services.

Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Program

Effec­tive dis­abil­ity man­age­ment for men­tal ill­ness must go beyond “man­ag­ing” dis­abil­ity to include both inpa­tient and out­pa­tient treat­ment. Treat­ment goals must incor­po­rate strate­gies for suc­cess­ful work rein­te­gra­tion to min­i­mize recur­rence and relapse.

The Home­wood Dis­abil­ity Treat­ment Pro­gram (HDTP) com­bines the ser­vices avail­able through the Home­wood Health Cen­tre – a nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre with the best national net­work of skilled men­tal health and addic­tion treat­ment pro­fes­sion­als through Home­wood Human Solu­tionsTM.

Home­wood Health Centre

Nation­ally rec­og­nized men­tal health and addic­tion facil­i­ties

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is Canada’s unsur­passed med­ical leader in addic­tion and men­tal health treat­ment, pro­vid­ing highly spe­cial­ized psy­chi­atric ser­vices to all Cana­di­ans. We are a 312-bed, Sched­ule 1 facil­ity under the Ontario Men­tal Health Act. We oper­ate nine pro­grams treat­ing a range of men­tal health and addic­tion issues.

Home­wood Health Cen­tre is located in Guelph, Ontario.

Schlegel Vil­lages

Con­tin­uum of care facil­i­ties for older adults (long-term care and retire­ment homes)

Schlegel Vil­lages are designed, built and man­aged by the Schlegel fam­ily of Kitch­ener, Ontario. Our motto: “It Takes a Vil­lage to Care” lives on.

Cana­dian owned and oper­ated, our Vil­lages ben­e­fit from the Schlegel fam­ily hav­ing over 40 years of direct expe­ri­ence co-owning, man­ag­ing and oper­at­ing Long Term Care and Retire­ment Com­mu­ni­ties in Ontario. There are eleven Schlegel Vil­lages hous­ing approx­i­mately 2500 seniors. Each Vil­lage has a Long Term Care com­po­nent, with Full Ser­vice Retire­ment Liv­ing, Assisted Care, Mem­ory Care and Inde­pen­dent Liv­ing options being added in stages. The first Schlegel Vil­lage opened in 1998 in Guelph.

Have you vis­ited our Pin­ter­est site? We have many, many more info­graph­ics to peruse. Have a look here!

We’re on Google Plus!

NOTE: The con­tent and opin­ions offered in Healthy Work­places blog posts do not nec­es­sar­ily reflect the for­mal stance of Home­wood Human Solu­tions, unless oth­er­wise iden­ti­fied. We bring this infor­ma­tion for­ward in the inter­ests of openly shar­ing val­ued infor­ma­tion in this time of fast-growing online con­ver­sa­tions and knowledge.

 

Latest mental health and addictions news

Men­tal Ill­ness Patients Strain Canada’s Police Forces

CBC News — Aug 21, 2013

Too many peo­ple who live with men­tal ill­ness are being released from provin­cial insti­tu­tions before they’re ready, then going on to com­mit crimes, say Canada’s police chiefs.

The can­did com­ments were made Wednes­day in Win­nipeg, on the final day of the Cana­dian Asso­ci­a­tion of Chiefs of Police (CACP) annual gen­eral meeting.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/08/21/mb-police-chiefs-mentally-ill.html

Youth Men­tal Health

Ottawa Cit­i­zen — August 23, 2013

There is a trou­bling new report on youth men­tal health to which the Ontario gov­ern­ment should pay par­tic­u­lar attention.

Accord­ing to the report by the Children?s Hos­pi­tal of East­ern Ontario and the Royal Men­tal Health Cen­tre, young peo­ple in the Ottawa region are wait­ing up to a year for men­tal health care, when the Cana­dian Psy­chi­atric Asso­ci­a­tion says it should be two weeks.

It is the human toll that it takes. Six to 12 months to see a psy­chi­a­trist for a youth and fam­ily in cri­sis is just too long“noted CHEO pres­i­dent Alex Munter. “It is an entire school year. For a youth to be able to learn and develop, and to have a suc­cess­ful school year, is very hard.”

The fig­ures really make dis­turb­ing read­ing: Since 2009, the num­ber of chil­dren and youth seek­ing CHEO’s help for men­tal ill­ness has shot up 64 per cent, while out­pa­tient refer­rals have gone up 76 per cent. The num­ber of patients admit­ted to CHEO with sui­cide risks has increased 33 per cent, and the num­ber with self-injury has gone up 61 per cent.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/opinion/editorials/Youth+mental+health/8826494/story.html

Agen­cies Pre­pare For Flood?s Effects on Men­tal Health

Cal­gary Her­ald — August 25, 2013

The flood waters have long receded, but a sec­ondary wave of disaster-driven men­tal health prob­lems may be only start­ing to crest.

Social ser­vice agen­cies in south­ern Alberta are prepar­ing for what they say could be a sig­nif­i­cant and long-term increase in cri­sis calls, as flood vic­tims begin to come to terms with the real­i­ties of lost homes and livelihoods.

I’m not an alarmist at all … I think it?s just some­thing we need to be aware of it,” said Stacey Petersen, exec­u­tive direc­tor of the Fresh Start Recov­ery Cen­tre, a res­i­den­tial alco­hol and drug addic­tion treat­ment cen­tre in Cal­gary. “From our stand­point, we’d rather be well-prepared and not needed, than ill-prepared and in trouble”.

http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/Agencies+prepare+flood+effects+mental+health/8831626/story.html

Change of Prac­tice Key to Improv­ing Patients’ Access to Psychiatrists

CMAJ — August 28, 2013

With 1 in 5 Cana­di­ans expected to expe­ri­ence a men­tal ill­ness in their life­time and a dwin­dling num­ber of psy­chi­a­trists, is the sup­ply of men­tal health ser­vices on track to meet demand?

The quick answer is prob­a­bly not. The more com­plex answer is that this is the wrong question.

There will never be enough psy­chi­a­trists to address all the men­tal health needs of Cana­di­ans, nor should there be,” says Dr. David Gold­bloom, chair of the Men­tal Health Com­mis­sion of Canada. While the num­ber of psy­chi­a­trists may be one aspect to the access prob­lem, Gold­bloom thinks this argu­ment has gone stale.

The key to address­ing prob­lems with access to men­tal health ser­vices in Canada is to change how psy­chi­a­trists prac­tice. But until we do so, Gold­bloom is quick to acknowl­edge that “We’re cur­rently not doing too well.”

Accord­ing to the National Physi­cian Sur­vey, the aver­age wait time for non-urgent cases across Canada in 2010 was 11 weeks in urban areas and up to 20 weeks in rural areas. In addi­tion, only 16% of urgent patients were seen within the day. Not sur­pris­ingly, 55% of fam­ily physi­cians rated access to psy­chi­atric care as fair or poor.

http://www.cmaj.ca/site/earlyreleases/28aug13_change-of-practice-key-to-improving-patients-access-to-psychiatrists.xhtml

For Uni­ver­si­ties, Approach To Men­tal Health Ser­vices Grow­ing Slowly

Vic­to­ria Times Colonist ? Sep­tem­ber 2, 2013

As men­tal health issues have received more media atten­tion, uni­ver­si­ties have honed their approach to on-campus ser­vices, invest­ing already lim­ited dol­lars and col­lab­o­rat­ing with other insti­tu­tions. Still, progress remains slow.

http://www.timescolonist.com/life/for-universities-approach-to-mental-health-services-growing-slowly-but-steadily-1.609507

First Nations Men­tal Health Focus Of Aid Project

Jew­ish human­i­tar­ian asso­ci­a­tion Vi’ahavta will send send health experts into communities

CBC News — Sep 6, 2013

A Jew­ish human­i­tar­ian asso­ci­a­tion plans to send men­tal health experts to seven First Nations com­mu­ni­ties in north­west­ern Ontario to help.

The move is part of Ve’ahavta’s first Cana­dian project. The orga­ni­za­tion has pre­vi­ously advised health care work­ers in Guyana and Kenya.

Vi’ahavta pres­i­dent Avrum Rosensweig said this is the first time the orga­ni­za­tion will oper­ate in Canada.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/story/2013/09/06/tby-first-nations-mental-health-project.html

Spe­cial­ists in Treat­ing Eat­ing Dis­or­ders Not Immune to Fat Bias, Study Suggests

Canada.com ? Sep­tem­ber 10, 2013

Peo­ple who spe­cial­ize in treat­ing eat­ing dis­or­ders can carry some of the same anti-fat atti­tudes and “fat pho­bia” towards obese peo­ple as the rest of soci­ety, new research suggests.

In what is being described as the first look at weight bias specif­i­cally among psy­chol­o­gists, ther­a­pists, social work­ers and other men­tal health pro­fes­sion­als spe­cial­iz­ing in eat­ing dis­or­ders, Yale Uni­ver­sity researchers found a con­sid­er­able per­cent­age believe obese patients have poor self-control, no willpower, and are self-indulgent, unat­trac­tive and insecure.

http://o.canada.com/2013/09/10/specialists-in-treating-eating-disorders-not-immune-to-fat-bias-study-suggests/

ADDICTION

Phar­ma­cies, Doc­tors Fail To Stop Nar­cotic Shop­ping Spree

CBC.ca  Sep­tem­ber 2, 2013

Two sis­ters in B.C. are going pub­lic to expose what they see as a big hole in the health sys­tem after a drug addict was able use their iden­ti­ties to get thou­sands of taxpayer-funded pre­scrip­tion nar­cotic pills.

San­dra Adam­son, a cook from Sur­rey who works for the RCMP, con­tacted CBC’s Go Pub­lic because she believes the sys­tems meant to detect and stop pre­scrip­tion abuse aren’t working.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/pharmacies-doctors-fail-to-stop-narcotic-shopping-spree-1.1367684

US Hos­pi­tal to Launch 1st In-Patient Inter­net Addic­tion Program

CBC.ca  Sep­tem­ber 4, 2013

A psy­chi­atric hos­pi­tal in Penn­syl­va­nia will soon open a new in-patient inter­net addic­tion pro­gram — the first of its kind in the United States or Canada.

Set to launch on Sept. 9 at the Brad­ford Regional Med­ical Cen­ter in Cen­tral Penn­syl­va­nia, the 10-day vol­un­tary pro­gram will see up to four adult patients at a time liv­ing within the hospital’s walls while work­ing to recover from what they say is a debil­i­tat­ing depen­dence on the web.

http://www.cbc.ca/newsblogs/yourcommunity/2013/09/us-hospital-to-launch-1st-in-patient-internet-addiction-program.html

Links Made Between Prob­lem Gam­bling and Sub­stance Abuse, And Lack of Treat­ment Options

Sci­ence Daily — Sep­tem­ber 4, 2013

Sep. 4, 2013 ? Prob­lem gam­blers are a hid­den pop­u­la­tion among peo­ple with men­tal health or sub­stance abuse issues who often don’t get the treat­ment they need, a new study shows. Any­where from 10 to 20 per cent of peo­ple with sub­stance abuse prob­lems also have sig­nif­i­cant gam­bling prob­lem, yet few pro­grams are tar­geted at them and most social ser­vice agen­cies don’t have funds to treat them, the study’s main author says.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130904105353.htm

B.C. Doc­tors Want To Pre­scribe Heroin for Selected Patients

Globe and Mail — Sep­tem­ber 8, 2013

Doc­tors in British Colum­bia are call­ing on Health Canada to per­mit pre­scrip­tion heroin for severely addicted patients exit­ing a ground­break­ing clin­i­cal trial, insist­ing a promis­ing alter­na­tive is not yet sup­ported by sci­en­tific evidence.

The calls come as the first par­tic­i­pants exit the SALOME trial, a three-year project launched by researchers from Prov­i­dence Health Care and the Uni­ver­sity of B.C. in late 2011 to deter­mine whether hydro­mor­phone, a pow­er­ful but legal opi­ate, is as effec­tive as diacetyl­mor­phine (pre­scrip­tion heroin) in help­ing severely addicted heroin users.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-doctors-want-to-prescribe-heroin-for-selected-patients/article14182339/

Seniors Health­care Should Be a Fed­eral Priority

The Globe and Mail — Aug. 19 2013

Cana­di­ans have lit­tle con­fi­dence in the abil­ity of the health-care sys­tem to meet the needs of a bur­geon­ing num­ber of seniors and they are look­ing to gov­ern­ment to shift their pri­or­i­ties and come up with a coher­ent plan.

That?s the mes­sage that emerges from a new poll com­mis­sioned by the Cana­dian Med­ical Association.

The anx­i­ety Cana­di­ans have about health care in their so-called golden years is both real and well-founded,” said Anna Reid, out­go­ing pres­i­dent of the CMA.

Nation­wide, three in five respon­dents said they believed there would not be suf­fi­cient hos­pi­tal beds, long-term care and home-care ser­vices to meet demand in their golden years.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/seniors-healthcare-should-be-a-federal-priority/article13836147/

Canada ‘Way Behind’ On Home-Care Help, Patient Advo­cates Say

Already har­ried sys­tem not ready for ris­ing home-care demand

CBC News — Aug 27, 2013

When patient advo­cate Donna Davis helped a friend nav­i­gate the tran­si­tion from hos­pi­tal to home care, she encoun­tered a vex­ing problem.

Hos­pi­tal and home-care work­ers “just tell you what to do,” Davis recalls. “It’s that pater­nal­is­tic: ?We will make the deci­sion for you. We will tell you when to go home. We will tell you how to go home.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/08/26/f-community-home-care.html

Alter­na­tive Level of Care: Canada’s Hos­pi­tal Beds, the Evi­dence and Options      

Health­care Pol­icy, 9(1) August 2013

Abstract

Patients des­ig­nated as alter­na­tive level of care (ALC) are an ongo­ing con­cern for health­care pol­icy mak­ers across Canada. These patients occupy valu­able hos­pi­tal beds and limit access to acute care ser­vices. The objec­tive of this paper is to present pol­icy alter­na­tives to address under­ly­ing fac­tors asso­ci­ated with ALC bed use. Three alter­na­tives, and their respec­tive lim­i­ta­tions and struc­tural chal­lenges, are dis­cussed. Poten­tial solu­tions may require a mix of pol­icy options pro­posed here.

RESEARCH / HEALTH

Alco­hol Depen­dence, Eat­ing Dis­or­ders Asso­ci­ated With Com­mon Genes

Med­ical News Today — August 23, 2013

Peo­ple with alco­hol depen­dence may be more genet­i­cally sus­cep­ti­ble to cer­tain types of eat­ing dis­or­ders, and vice-versa, accord­ing to a study in the Sep­tem­ber issue of the Jour­nal of Stud­ies on Alco­hol and Drugs.

In a study of nearly 6,000 adult twins, researchers found that com­mon genetic fac­tors seemed to under­lie both alco­holism and cer­tain eat­ing dis­or­der symp­toms — namely, binge eat­ing and purg­ing habits, such as self-induced vom­it­ing or lax­a­tive abuse. Genes appeared to explain 38 per­cent to 53 per­cent of the risk of devel­op­ing those disorders.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/265107.php

How the Brain Remem­bers Plea­sure: Impli­ca­tions for Addiction

Sci­ence Daily — August 25, 2013

Aug. 25, 2013 — Key details of the way nerve cells in the brain remem­ber plea­sure are revealed in a study by Uni­ver­sity of Alabama at Birm­ing­ham (UAB) researchers pub­lished today in the jour­nal Nature Neu­ro­science. The mol­e­c­u­lar events that form such “reward mem­o­ries” appear to dif­fer from those cre­ated by drug addic­tion, despite the pop­u­lar the­ory that addic­tion hijacks nor­mal reward pathways.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130825171530.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Latest+Science+News%29

Psy­chother­apy via the Internet

eHealthNews.eu — 19 August 2013

Does psy­chother­apy via the Inter­net work? For the first time, clin­i­cal researchers from the Uni­ver­sity of Zurich have stud­ied whether online psy­chother­apy and con­ven­tional face-to-face ther­apy are equally effec­tive in exper­i­ments. Based on ear­lier stud­ies, the Zurich team assumed that the two forms of ther­apy were on a par. Not only was their the­ory con­firmed, the results for online ther­apy even exceeded their expectations.

Six ther­a­pists treated 62 patients, the major­ity of whom were suf­fer­ing from mod­er­ate depres­sion. The patients were divided into two equal groups at ran­dom and assigned to one of the ther­a­peu­tic forms. The treat­ment con­sisted of eight ses­sions with dif­fer­ent estab­lished tech­niques that stem from cog­ni­tive behav­ior ther­apy and could be car­ried out both orally and in writ­ing. Patients treated online had to per­form one pre­de­ter­mined writ­ten task per ther­apy unit — such as query­ing their own neg­a­tive self-image. They were known to the ther­a­pist by name.

Online ther­apy even more effec­tive in the medium term

In both groups, the depres­sion val­ues fell sig­nif­i­cantly,” says Pro­fes­sor Andreas Maer­cker, sum­ming up the results of the study. At the end of the treat­ment, no more depres­sion could be diag­nosed in 53 per­cent of the patients who under­went online ther­apy — com­pared to 50 per­cent for face-to-face ther­apy. Three months after com­plet­ing the treat­ment, the depres­sion in patients treated online even decreased whereas those treated con­ven­tion­ally only dis­played a min­i­mal decline: no more depres­sion could be detected in 57 per­cent of patients from online ther­apy com­pared to 42 per­cent with con­ven­tional therapy.

For both patient groups, the degree of sat­is­fac­tion with the treat­ment and ther­a­pists was more or less equally high. 96 per­cent of the patients given online ther­apy and 91 per­cent of the recip­i­ents of con­ven­tional treat­ment rated the con­tact with their ther­a­pist as “per­sonal”. In the case of online ther­apy, the patients tended to use the ther­apy con­tacts and sub­se­quent home­work very inten­sively to progress per­son­ally. For instance, they indi­cated that they had re-read the cor­re­spon­dence with their ther­a­pist from time to time. “In the medium term, online psy­chother­apy even yields bet­ter results. Our study is evi­dence that psy­chother­a­peu­tic ser­vices on the inter­net are an effec­tive sup­ple­ment to ther­a­peu­tic care,” con­cludes Maercker.

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